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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • A world in itself

    From a height of some 50 metres, you have the entire ITER worksite at your feet. The long rectangle of the Diagnostics Building stands out in the centre, with [...]

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  • US completes toroidal field deliveries for ITER

    The US Domestic Agency achieved a major milestone in February by completing the delivery of all US-supplied toroidal field conductor to the European toroidal fi [...]

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  • Thin diagnostic coils to be fitted into giant magnets

    Last week was marked by the first delivery of diagnostic components—Continuous External Rogowski (CER) coils—from the European Domestic Agency to the ITER Organ [...]

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  • Addressing the challenge of plasma disruptions

    Plasma disruptions are fast events in tokamak plasmas that lead to the complete loss of the thermal and magnetic energy stored in the plasma. The plasma control [...]

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  • Blending (almost) seamlessly into the landscape

    Located in the foothills of the French Pre-Alps, the ITER installation blends almost seamlessly into the landscape. The architects' choice ofmirror-like steel c [...]

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Of Interest

See archived articles

Roll up for the Alcator C-Mod virtual tour!

Opportunities to tour the inside of a tokamak are not very frequent. In order to share this unique experience, Robert T. Mumgaard, a grad student at MIT's Plasma Science and Fusion Center (PSFC), and Chris Bolin, of Bolin Photography in Cambridge, Massachusetts (US) teamed up to develop a technique that delivers a spectacular virtual tour of the interior of Alcator C-Mod, presently the largest fusion reactor operated by a university.

The next best thing to actually walking inside a tokamak: embarking on Mumgaard and Bolin's virtual tour of MIT's tokamak Alcator C-Mod. (Click to view larger version...)
The next best thing to actually walking inside a tokamak: embarking on Mumgaard and Bolin's virtual tour of MIT's tokamak Alcator C-Mod.
At the end of 2013, as the machine was open for maintenance, they acquired some 1,600 high resolution pictures of the vacuum vessel that they later stitched together to form 360x180-degree projections (photography buffs will find detailed explanations in this document.)

Embarking on Mumgaard and Bolin's virtual tour of Alcator C-Mod is the next best thing to actually walking inside a tokamak—you can check for yourself on PSFC's website.


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