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Of Interest

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Fusion, explained by Sammy (13) and Daan (12)

-S.G.

The task was to make a film related to global warming and climate change. A challenge 12-year-old Daan and his 13-year-old classmate Sammy from the Coornhert High School in Gouda, Netherlands, were more than ready to take up.  "I had recently seen a video explaining the basics of fusion energy and thought this would be the perfect opportunity to learn more about it," Daan recalls. And so the story begins ...

Sammy, a 13 year-old from Coornhert High School in Gouda, Netherlands, and her classmate Daan, 12, are the ''Coornhert fusion research team''—creators of a new educational video on fusion. (Click to view larger version...)
Sammy, a 13 year-old from Coornhert High School in Gouda, Netherlands, and her classmate Daan, 12, are the ''Coornhert fusion research team''—creators of a new educational video on fusion.
"We first did some basic research on the subject, though this was pretty difficult as most of the information we could find was in the form of either technical papers about fusion experiments or oversimplified models. When we discovered there wasn't a simple but yet realistic explanation about fusion energy we decided to base our video around that."

So the "Coornhert fusion research team," as Daan and Sammy soon called themselves, developed a script, filmed some takes, recorded the audio (Daan recorded the English, Sammy the Dutch), and moved on to editing. "I think in total the editing, 3D modelling and motion tracking took me about 36 hours—mostly because halfway through rendering my hard drive crashed and I had to start all over again," Daan says. "But in the end it worked and we are very happy with the result."

To see the result of the students' efforts, click for the English or Dutch versions. 


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