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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Neutral beam injection | How ELISE is contributing to ITER

    ITER's neutral beam injection system is based on a radio frequency source that has been the subject of decades of development in Europe. At Max Planck Institute [...]

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  • Image of the week | Almost there

    The Tokamak Building has reached its maximum height ... in terms of concrete that is. The 'jewel box' in reinforced concrete will grow no more; instead, it will [...]

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  • Powerful lasers | A mockup to demonstrate safety

    During ITER operation, high-powered lasers will gather important diagnostic information on the properties and behaviour of the plasma, such as density, temperat [...]

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  • Cryostat | Lower cylinder revealed

    They were all there: those who designed it, those who forged it, those who assembled and welded it, and those who closely monitored the requirements and procedu [...]

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  • Europe's DEMO | What it could be like

    It looks like ITER, feels like ITER, but it's not ITER. In this depiction of what the site layout for the next-step fusion machine, DEMO, might look like in Eur [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

Fusion research benefits society (2/4)

Developing fusion science, engineering and technology to a point where fusion energy can be supplied to the grid is one of the most exciting challenges of the 21st century, and potentially one of the most rewarding.

Since last week, Newsline has been featuring a series of videos that highlight the small and large advances that are being made daily. Improvements in industrial processes, new materials, innovative remote handling technologies, computer modelling techniques ... these products of fusion R&D at the cutting edge of science and technology are not only benefitting the fusion development effort, but also society at large through spinoff technologies.

This second video produced by the European Commission takes us to the Netherlands, where a company specialized in explosive metal forming techniques has expanded its horizons—and its client base—through work carried out for the European fusion program.

3D Metal Forming, which uses shock waves to press thin metal sheets into desired shapes, took on the challenging of using the same technique to form the thick, 6-cm steel plates used to manufacture the ITER vacuum vessel. Its success has led to applications in the aeronautics industry, the construction of a large new factory, and expectations of rapid growth.


Click here to view the video...



Many more videos are available on the ITER video page...

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