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Latest ITER Newsline

  • Question of the week | Will fusion run out of fuel?

    One of the paradoxes of fusion, the virtually inexhaustible energy of the future, is that it relies on an element that does not exist—or just barely. Tritium, o [...]

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  • Managing data | Setting up a robust process

    Are the ITER systems and processes robust enough to manage the technical and project data for a program of ITER's complexity? Will quality information be made a [...]

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  • Image of the week | Bullseye

    Two perfectly circular structures, looking a lot like archery targets, have been installed on the west-facing wall of the Tokamak Complex. They are not for sh [...]

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  • Art and science | Seeking new perspectives on fusion

    Standing in the middle of the Tokamak Building, sound artist Julian Weaver positions his 3D microphone near one of the openings of the bioshield to record the s [...]

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  • Worksite photos | The view one never tires of

    For the past three-and a half years, ITER Communication has been documenting construction progress from the top of the tallest crane on the ITER worksite. Altho [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

Turkey contemplates all energy options

Ms Deniz Erdoğan Barım, the Turkish Consul General in Marseille (seen here with DG Motojima), visited the ITER construction site on Wednesday 29 January. Her country, highly dependent on fuel imports needs ''to contemplate all the [energy] options'', including fusion. (Click to view larger version...)
Ms Deniz Erdoğan Barım, the Turkish Consul General in Marseille (seen here with DG Motojima), visited the ITER construction site on Wednesday 29 January. Her country, highly dependent on fuel imports needs ''to contemplate all the [energy] options'', including fusion.
With only 26 percent of its national demand for energy met through domestic resources, Turkey is highly dependent on fuel imports, primarily oil and gas.

Electricity production has already doubled since 2001 and will have to double again by 2020 in order to meet the needs of the fast-growing economy. Turkey aims to produce 30 percent of its electricity by way of renewables in 2023 and intends to establish 10 gigawatts of nuclear capacity by 2030.

In this context, fusion energy is the focus of strong interest from Turkish laboratories, government circles and utility companies.

"We need to contemplate all the options," said Ms Deniz Erdoğan Barım, the Turkish Consul General in Marseille, who visited the ITER construction site on Wednesday 29 January. "It was very important for me to take the measure of the ITER Project, of the complexity of its organization and of the challenges of its schedule."

The Consul General showed great enthusiasm for ITER and fusion energy as she discussed the project at length with ITER Director-General Osamu Motojima, who welcomes Turkey's interest in ITER.


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