Nuclear Fusion Award winner announced

Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:

Please enter your email address:

@

Your email address will only be used for the purpose of sending you the ITER Organization publication(s) that you have requested. ITER Organization will not transfer your email address or other personal data to any other party or use it for commercial purposes.

If you change your mind, you can easily unsubscribe by clicking the unsubscribe option at the bottom of an email you've received from ITER Organization.

For more information, see our Privacy policy.

News & Media

Links

Of Interest

See archived articles

Conferences


Nuclear Fusion Award winner announced

At the 21st IAEA Fusion Energy Conference in Chengdu, China, the lead author of a paper that demonstrates how one of the primary physics goals of ITER might be more safely realised was awarded the inaugural Nuclear Fusion Award, which is presented by the IAEA.

Winner of the inaugural Nuclear Fusion Award, Dr Timothy C. Luce (General Atomics), is presented with his award by Professor Werner Burkart (Deputy Director General, International Atomic Energy Agency) and Dr Mitsuru Kikuchi (Chairman of the Board of Editors, Nuclear Fusion and Director Division of Advanced Plasma Research, Japan Atomic Energy Agency) at the 21st IAEA fusion conference.
 (Click to view larger version...)
Winner of the inaugural Nuclear Fusion Award, Dr Timothy C. Luce (General Atomics), is presented with his award by Professor Werner Burkart (Deputy Director General, International Atomic Energy Agency) and Dr Mitsuru Kikuchi (Chairman of the Board of Editors, Nuclear Fusion and Director Division of Advanced Plasma Research, Japan Atomic Energy Agency) at the 21st IAEA fusion conference.
T.C. Luce et al. were awarded the prestigious prize for their paper 'Stationary high-performance discharges in the DIII-D tokamak' (Nuclear Fusion 43 (5), pp. 321-329). The paper outlines a tokamak scenario that can maintain high fusion performance at reduced plasma current (compared with the conventional tokamak operational scenario), thereby lessening the potential for structural damage in the event of a plasma disruption. Projections in the paper show that realization of this scenario in ITER could lead to fusion performance at or above an energy gain of 10 for longer duration with reduced risk.


return to Newsline #2