Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:


Please enter your email address:

@

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Tokamak Complex | Interior design

    Fresh from the offices of the Design& Construction Integration Division, this cutaway drawing peels back the walls to reveal theinterior layout of the Tokam [...]

    Read more

  • Fusion world | A visit to Kyoto's heliotron

    At the Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, researchers have been exploring the heliotron concept of magnetic fusion device for more than half a cent [...]

    Read more

  • Construction site | The lights of autumn

    Summer is over in Provence and the beautiful autumn light is back, revealing every detail of the landscape ... and of the ongoing works on the ITER construction [...]

    Read more

  • Cryostat | A true sense of size

    Just like a thermos provides the insulation to keep your coffee warm—or your water cold—the ITER cryostat raises a barrier around the superconducting magnets th [...]

    Read more

  • Image of the week | ITER at 10

    The ITER Organization was established ten years ago, on 24 October 2007. A week ahead of the official anniversary, part of the ITER staff, now numbering 800, ga [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived articles

What does Brexit mean for ITER?

ITER Communication

 ITER has already shown itself to be a stable collaboration, unaffected by political tensions. (Click to view larger version...)
ITER has already shown itself to be a stable collaboration, unaffected by political tensions.
The results of the "Brexit" referendum in the United Kingdom are raising many questions throughout Europe and the world, and of course, within ITER.

As the United Kingdom will remain part of the European Union until negotiations are concluded and ratified—a process that could take many years—its relation with ITER, for the present, will not be affected. The referendum results will not create any near-term changes in the Organization's plans or projections (e.g., related to schedule and resources), nor does ITER anticipate any changes in how procurement contracts or the employment contracts of United Kingdom staff are treated.

European membership in ITER is through EURATOM, an agreement that was established in 1957 and is legally distinct from the European Union. EURATOM, which has the same membership as the European Union, has one "associated state" —Switzerland, who is an active participant in the ITER Project.

From a broader point of view, science and technology collaborations tend to be less politically vulnerable to political change than some other types of collaboration. ITER has already shown itself to be a stable collaboration, unaffected by political tensions that may arise from time to time between its Members.

So what does Brexit mean for ITER? For now, and probably for the coming years ... business as usual.


return to the latest published articles