Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:


Please enter your email address:

@

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Cold boxes reach home

    Three cryogenic plant cold boxeswere moved last week from temporary storage to their final destination on the ITER site. It was the occasion to remember a piece [...]

    Read more

  • Kazakh Tokamak celebrates first plasma

    The fusion world directed its applause to the east earlier this month as the Kazakh tokamak KTM started operations with a first plasma discharge. 'We are happ [...]

    Read more

  • Small delivery for a very massive tool

    At ITER, two massive sector sub-assembly toolswill suspend and equip the vacuum vessel sectors in the Assembly Hall before they are transported by overhead cran [...]

    Read more

  • Without minimizing challenges, Council reaffirms commitment

    On 24 October 2007, the ITER Organization was officially established following the ratification by the seven ITER Members of the project's constitutive document [...]

    Read more

  • Heat waves

    Plasma is like a tenuous mist of particles—light atoms that have been dissociated into ions (the atom nucleus) and free-roaming electrons. In order to study pla [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived articles

Many will be heavier, none will be wider

Of all the components that will be delivered to ITER in the years to come, many will be heavier, taller and more spectacular than the two "E-Houses" that reached the worksite shortly after 1:00 a.m. on Thursday 9 February.

The ''E-house'' that was installed on its final location upon arrival was the smallest of the two. Still, at 8.3 metres wide, it was no small achievement to get it through the densely packed ITER worksite © DAHER (Click to view larger version...)
The ''E-house'' that was installed on its final location upon arrival was the smallest of the two. Still, at 8.3 metres wide, it was no small achievement to get it through the densely packed ITER worksite © DAHER
But none will be wider: at 8.7 metres wide, the larger of the two E-houses was just 30 centimetres below the limit that the ITER Itinerary can accept...

The two "houses" had travelled together from China. Upon arrival at ITER, the larger E-house (27 metres long, 8.7 metres wide, 130 tonnes) was put in storage at the entrance of the ITER site until its concrete base could be realized; its near twin (24 metres long, 8.3 metres wide, 110 tonnes) was installed in its final location between the electrical switchyard and the large transformers.

The installed E-house will be progressively equipped with the complex set of cables that will connect it through the switchyard to the French national grid.


return to the latest published articles