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Latest ITER Newsline

  • Cryolines | Another day, another spool

    Having wedged his body and equipment into the cramped space between the ceiling and the massive pipe, a worker is busy welding two cryolines spools. A few metre [...]

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  • Image of the week | Bearings unveiled

    The construction teams are in the last stages of preparing the Tokamak pit for the first major operation of ITER machine assembly: the lowering of the cryostat [...]

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  • Technology | Perfecting tritium breeding for DEMO and beyond

    While ITER will never breed tritium for its own consumption, it will test breeding blanket concepts—the tools and techniques that designers of future DEMO react [...]

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  • Fusion world | Japan and Europe complete the assembly of JT-60SA

    The JT-60SA fusion experiment in Naka, Japan, is designed to explore advanced plasma physics in support of the operation of ITER and next-phase devices. After s [...]

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  • Manufacturing | Thermal shield milestone in Korea

    Six years after the start of fabrication, Korean contractor SFA has completed the last 40° sector of vacuum vessel thermal shield. The stainless steel panels, c [...]

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Of Interest

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Crane vs crane

As action will soon move toward the adjoining Assembly Building area, two of the four cranes that operated over the Pit were dismantled this week. (Click to view larger version...)
As action will soon move toward the adjoining Assembly Building area, two of the four cranes that operated over the Pit were dismantled this week.
With the 493rd and final antiseismic pad installed and the retaining walls finalized, a relative quiet has settled over the ITER Tokamak Pit.

As action will soon move toward the adjoining Assembly Building area, two of the four cranes that operated over the Pit were dismantled this week.

Crane C4, located on the northwest corner of the work site, was taken down on Monday 23 April. Two days later, a similar operation was performed on crane C3 in the south corner.

Dismantling a 50-metre-high tower crane is a delicate and spectacular operation. First, it's necessary to remove the concrete counterweights that balance the 65-metre-long boom. Once the 15 tonnes of counterweights have been lowered, crane dismantling specialists climb into the boom to begin the detachment process.

''The only real difficulty,'' explains a crane dismantling specialist ''is the wind. Also ... finding enough room to lay the boom on the ground ...'' (Click to view larger version...)
''The only real difficulty,'' explains a crane dismantling specialist ''is the wind. Also ... finding enough room to lay the boom on the ground ...''
With the boom hanging solidly from a mobile crane, specialists can begin unscrewing the large bolts that connect the 14.7-tonne boom to the tower. Once freed, the lifting crane slowly moves it down to the ground where it will await further dismantling.

"The only real difficulty," explains dismantling specialist Armand Depit of MAGSUD, based in Aix-en-Provence, "is the wind. Also ... finding enough room to lay the boom on the ground ..."

On Wednesday, as crane C3 was dismantled, the air was perfectly still on the ITER platform and there was still plenty of room—although not for long—in the Tokamak Pit work site perimeter.

The dismantling operation went smoothly and took less than one hour and a half.


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