Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:


Please enter your email address:

@

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Real-time collaboration delivers for fusion computing

    A key computing system for ITER is now being trialled at the European tokamak JET, following collaboration betweenteams at the UK's Culham Centre for Fusion Ene [...]

    Read more

  • The balance of power

    It comes as no surprise that the French railway operator SNCF is the largest consumer of electricity in the country—it takes a lot of megawatts to power 500 sup [...]

    Read more

  • "Dummy" winding takes shape

    As orange lights flash and machines softly hum, layer one of a 'dummy' pancake winding (the building block of a poloidal field coil) is taking shape on the wind [...]

    Read more

  • As big (and heavy) as a whale

    It was pouring when the two 35-metre-long quench tanks were delivered to the ITER site at 2:12 a.m. on Thursday 24 November. And it was still raining heavily on [...]

    Read more

  • A passage to India

    108 days, 10,200 kilometres, 16 countries, and only two flat tires. These are the remarkable statistics of a no-less-remarkable journey: a father and son who tr [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived articles

Swedish academy engineers visit ITER site

So far, only a few people have seen it from the inside. The Swedish delegation visits the Poloidal Field Coils Winding Facility. (Click to view larger version...)
So far, only a few people have seen it from the inside. The Swedish delegation visits the Poloidal Field Coils Winding Facility.
This Friday, a delegation of engineers from the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences and the Royal Institute of Technology came to Cadarache to take a close look at the first concrete footprints of the ITER project. After an introduction to the project given by Director-General Osamu Motojima, the visitors were invited to an extensive site tour, which finally led them right into the heart of the Tokamak Pit.

A hands-on experience for the Swedish engineers: Timothy Watson, Head of the ITER Buildings & Site Infrastructure Directorate, explains the installation and function of the anti-seismic bearings. (Click to view larger version...)
A hands-on experience for the Swedish engineers: Timothy Watson, Head of the ITER Buildings & Site Infrastructure Directorate, explains the installation and function of the anti-seismic bearings.
After 45 minutes touring in the midday heat, the honourable academy members were glad to be back on the air conditioned bus ... exhausted, but thrilled by this "fascinating project."


return to the latest published articles