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Latest ITER Newsline

  • Cryolines | Not just any pipes

    In order to produce and sustain plasmas ten times hotter than the core of the Sun, some essential elements of the ITER machine need to be cooled to temperatures [...]

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  • Symposium in Japan | Fusion attracts strong political support

    A recent symposium in Japan on fusion energy attracted 500 participants. The Fusion Energy Forum of Japan was established in 2002 for the purpose of promoting [...]

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  • Fiction | "Steampunk" fusion machine travels in time

    Ever since a 'Mr Fusion' device appeared on Doc's time-travelling DeLorean in the first opus of the Back to the Future trilogy (1985), fusion energy has exerted [...]

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  • Construction | Honouring the crown mockup

    Medieval stone masons used to engrave their personal mark on the walls and pillars of the cathedrals they contributed to building. Their present-day counterpart [...]

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  • Neutral beam diagnostics | Right in the line of the beam

    A high-precision diagnostic is about to enter into service at the ITER Neutral Beam Test Facility, where scientists are testing key aspects of ITER's external h [...]

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Of Interest

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The day the rain comes

Eleven-metre-deep trenches now crisscross the platform to accommodate 1.6 kilometres of concrete piping. Maximum diameter: 2.2 metres. (Click to view larger version...)
Eleven-metre-deep trenches now crisscross the platform to accommodate 1.6 kilometres of concrete piping. Maximum diameter: 2.2 metres.
There was a time when the 42-hectare ITER platform was as flat as a pancake. Now, as work progress on the deep underground drainage network, the landscape is in some areas reminiscent of a World War I battlefield.

Eleven-metre-deep trenches now crisscross the platform to accommodate 1.6 km of concrete piping. These pipes, measuring up to 2.2 metres in diameter, will collect rainwater from the platform buildings, roads and trenches.

A branch of the underground network has been designed to evacuate the overflow of a "centennial rain" — extreme rainfall that, statistically, occurs only once every century, but that can lead to water flow estimated at 17.8 m³ per second.

Based on this estimate, a safety margin of approximately 20 percent has been applied to the calculation of ITER's underground rainwater network, which has been dimensioned for a flow of 21.5 m³ per second.

The whole network connects to the storm basins located at the southwest corner of the site through an underground network that was put in place by Agence Iter France during the site preparation phase.

This giant plumbing operation, which necessitated the removal of 50,000 m³ of earth, began in March and will be completed in November.


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