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Latest ITER Newsline

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    H‐mode—or thesudden improvement of plasma confinement in the magnetic field of tokamaksby approximatelya factor of two—is thehigh confinement regime that all mo [...]

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  • An outing into the future

    Open Doors days occur with scientific regularity at ITER (spring and autumn) and yet—due to the rapid evolution of work on site—each event offers something new. [...]

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    Grandfathers like to tell stories. And Robert Aymar, the 'grandfather' of the French fusion community, is no exception. 'Being so old,' he quipped at last week' [...]

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  • An AC/DC adapter ... ITER size

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Of Interest

See archived articles

ITER contracts lead to new jobs in New Jersey

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At Oxford Superconducting Technology in Carteret, New Jersey (USA), two contracts for ITER have the company creating jobs, investing in new equipment, expanding its production capacity, and operating three shifts a day.

Oxford Superconducting will produce nearly 10,000 miles (16,000 km) of niobium-tin (Nb3Sn) superconducting wire for the ITER Project as part of contracts signed with the European and the US ITER Domestic Agencies. The company has increased its production to 30 tonnes per year, up from just a few tonnes previously.

The ITER contracts have pushed the company to strengthen its design and manufacturing processes. "The ITER quality requirements are quite rigorous, so we've had to increase our expertise in that area," says Jeffrey Parrell, vice president and general manager of the company. "These improved skills will be with us after the project is over, and we've already applied them to other areas of business as well."



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