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Latest ITER Newsline

  • Cryoplant | Filled from floor to ceiling

    The ITER cryoplant used to be a vast echoey chamber with 5,400 m² of interior space divided into two areas; now, it is filled from floor to ceiling with industr [...]

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  • Cryostat | Adjusting, welding, testing ...

    The assembly of the ITER cryostat—the stainless steel "thermos" that insulates the ultra-cold superconducting magnets from the environment—is progress [...]

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  • Tokamak Building | Full steam ahead

    In this central arena of the construction site, construction teams are active three shifts a day—two full work shifts and a third, at night, dedicated to moving [...]

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  • Poloidal field coils | Turning tables and hot resin

    One of only two manufacturing facilities located on the ITER site, the Poloidal Field Coils Winding Facility was constructed by Europe to house the winding, imp [...]

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  • Assembly Hall | One giant standing

    Two identical handling tools in the Assembly Hall will play a critical role in preparing ITER's nine vacuum vessel sectors for their final journey: transport by [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

ITER contracts lead to new jobs in New Jersey

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At Oxford Superconducting Technology in Carteret, New Jersey (USA), two contracts for ITER have the company creating jobs, investing in new equipment, expanding its production capacity, and operating three shifts a day.

Oxford Superconducting will produce nearly 10,000 miles (16,000 km) of niobium-tin (Nb3Sn) superconducting wire for the ITER Project as part of contracts signed with the European and the US ITER Domestic Agencies. The company has increased its production to 30 tonnes per year, up from just a few tonnes previously.

The ITER contracts have pushed the company to strengthen its design and manufacturing processes. "The ITER quality requirements are quite rigorous, so we've had to increase our expertise in that area," says Jeffrey Parrell, vice president and general manager of the company. "These improved skills will be with us after the project is over, and we've already applied them to other areas of business as well."



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