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Latest ITER Newsline

  • Port cells | All 46 doors in place

    In ITER, ordinary objects and features often take on an awesome dimension. Take the doors that seal off the port cells around the Tokamak for instance. Doors th [...]

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  • Toroidal field coils | Two make a pair

    One of the essential 'building blocks' of the ITER Tokamak is the pre-assembly of two toroidal field coils, one vacuum vessel sector and corresponding panels of [...]

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  • Industrial milestone | Cryostat manufacturing comes to an end in India

    With a flag-off ceremony on 30 June, India's L&T Heavy Engineering marked the end of an eight-year industrial adventure—the manufacturing of the ITER cryost [...]

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  • Local partners | A celebration for ITER's "vital artery"

    ITER is made possible through the work of thousands of scientists, engineers, workers of all trades and industries across the globe. It is also made possible by [...]

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  • Photo reportage | Travelling with a coil

    From the salt marshes of the inland sea Étang-de-Berre to the rolling hills around the ITER site (with a view of some of the highest alpine summits) an ITER con [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

ITER contracts lead to new jobs in New Jersey

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At Oxford Superconducting Technology in Carteret, New Jersey (USA), two contracts for ITER have the company creating jobs, investing in new equipment, expanding its production capacity, and operating three shifts a day.

Oxford Superconducting will produce nearly 10,000 miles (16,000 km) of niobium-tin (Nb3Sn) superconducting wire for the ITER Project as part of contracts signed with the European and the US ITER Domestic Agencies. The company has increased its production to 30 tonnes per year, up from just a few tonnes previously.

The ITER contracts have pushed the company to strengthen its design and manufacturing processes. "The ITER quality requirements are quite rigorous, so we've had to increase our expertise in that area," says Jeffrey Parrell, vice president and general manager of the company. "These improved skills will be with us after the project is over, and we've already applied them to other areas of business as well."



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