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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Making remote handling less remote

    Over a wet and windy three-day period on the ITER site in November, around 90 representatives of the ITER Organization, the Domestic Agencies of Europe and Japa [...]

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  • The framework for sharing ITER intellectual property

    In signing the ITER Agreement in 2006, the seven ITER Members were agreeing not only to share in the costs of constructing and operating the ITER facility, but [...]

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  • Wendelstein achieves ultra-precise magnetic topology

    A recent article in the online journal Nature Communications confirms that the complex topology of the magnetic field of Wendelstein 7-X—the world's largest ste [...]

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  • The Matrix, rigid and fluid

    A fast-growing array of structures and buildings has been emerging across the ITER worksite platform under the control and supervision of the European Domestic [...]

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  • By road, river and sea

    They travelled by road from the Air Liquide factory near Grenoble, sailed down the Rhône River from Lyon and entered the Mediterranean to the east of Fos-sur-Me [...]

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Of Interest

See archived articles

"Anaglyph," the other word for 3D



This image, taken inside the Tokamak Seismic Pit last Tuesday, is an "anaglyph." It was made by combining two slightly offset and differently filtered photographs into one single image. When using 3D glasses (with a red filter on the left eye and a cyan filter on the right eye), the visual cortex of the brain fuses the two images into one, creating a three-dimensional perception of the scene.

The alignment of plinths on the floor of the Tokamak Seismic Pit offered Jean Jacquinot, former director of JET and photography enthusiast, with a perfect setting to try the anaglyph technique.

If you don't have 3D glasses yet, well... make them!


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