Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:


Please enter your email address:

@

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Making remote handling less remote

    Over a wet and windy three-day period on the ITER site in November, around 90 representatives of the ITER Organization, the Domestic Agencies of Europe and Japa [...]

    Read more

  • The framework for sharing ITER intellectual property

    In signing the ITER Agreement in 2006, the seven ITER Members were agreeing not only to share in the costs of constructing and operating the ITER facility, but [...]

    Read more

  • Wendelstein achieves ultra-precise magnetic topology

    A recent article in the online journal Nature Communications confirms that the complex topology of the magnetic field of Wendelstein 7-X—the world's largest ste [...]

    Read more

  • The Matrix, rigid and fluid

    A fast-growing array of structures and buildings has been emerging across the ITER worksite platform under the control and supervision of the European Domestic [...]

    Read more

  • By road, river and sea

    They travelled by road from the Air Liquide factory near Grenoble, sailed down the Rhône River from Lyon and entered the Mediterranean to the east of Fos-sur-Me [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived articles

Small macro, substantial savings

-Robert Arnoux

The winning team: from left to right, Wolfgang Werner, Elisabeth Storath, Yoan Cuvillier, Tristan Sarot and Bastien Bezol. (Click to view larger version...)
The winning team: from left to right, Wolfgang Werner, Elisabeth Storath, Yoan Cuvillier, Tristan Sarot and Bastien Bezol.
When CAD Designer Yoan Cuvillier was faced with endless months of work virtually positioning thousands of tiny components on the vacuum vessel shell 3D model, he thought that maybe there was a better way to do it than one by one.

Yoann and his colleague Tristan Sarot had already spent four months positioning the clamps that hold the electric loops in one sector of the vacuum vessel shell (these electric loops are part of a diagnostic system that measures the energy of the plasma). Each loop needs about 30 to 470 clamps; there are some 40 loops in each sector and there are eight sectors that need to be equipped.

Do the math: almost three man/years of work were required just to position the clamps...

Following the required procedure, Yoan created a "CAD/ENOVIA ticket" suggesting the task could be automated (CATIA is the software used by CAD designers at ITER, ENOVIA is the database).

Tackling the issue along with the young the 21-year-old CAD designer, IT and the CAD Infrastructure & Applications Team (namely CAD Support Technician Bastien Bezol; CAD Development Coordinator Elisabeth Storath and CAD Responsible Officer Wolfgang Werner) soon produced a "macro" (a set of repetitive instructions) which not only allowed for the automatic positioning of the clamps but which could be applied to any repetitive action on components.

The macro produced almost perfect results on the first try-out. It now takes 10 to 30 minutes to clamp a loop, when an average of one full day was required previously. (Click to view larger version...)
The macro produced almost perfect results on the first try-out. It now takes 10 to 30 minutes to clamp a loop, when an average of one full day was required previously.
"There are of course software developments that accelerate this kind of work," explains Wolfgang Werner. "But this was the first time the idea, and the suggestions, came from a CAD Designer."

The "CATIA Macro for Clamps Positioning" that Bastien Bezol conceptualized, and that IT implemented, "produced almost perfect results on the first try-out," says Wolfgang. It now takes 10 to 30 minutes to clamp a loop, when an average of one full day was required previously.

A mere hundred lines of code had done the trick—no more dull, repetitive work for Yoan, Tristan and their CAD designer colleagues, and a substantial savings in manpower and time for the ITER Organization.


return to the latest published articles