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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Worksite | First pillars for the crane hall

    For the overhead cranes to deliver machine components into the Tokamak assembly pit, the rails that carry them need to be extended some 80 metres beyond the tem [...]

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  • Transport | 300 tonnes of equipment on its way to ITER

    A specially designed assembly tool and elements of the cryostat and vacuum vessel thermal shields are part of the shipments travelling now from Korea to ITER. W [...]

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  • Fusion world | A new tokamak in town

    After EAST in China and WEST in France, another of the cardinal points of the compass has been chosen to name a tokamak. Introducing NORTH—the NORdic Tokamak de [...]

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  • Opportunities | Bringing the ITER Business Forum to Washington

    Every second year, a two-day ITER Business Forum is held to invite existing and potential suppliers for the ITER Project—laboratories, universities, and compani [...]

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  • World Energy Congress | Fusion "at a time of transition"

    In the United Arab Emirates, Abu Dhabi is often referred to as a tourism hotspot that combines luxury and ancient traditions. In September, Abu Dhabi was in the [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

Remember when it was smooth?

The 42-hectare ITER platform used to be as smooth and as flat as a billiard table. These days it's hard to find a clear patch.

Site adaptation activities (modified entrances and roadworks), digging and pipe-laying for critical networks and galleries, portable office construction, and network installation for the new Contractors Area in the southwest corner of the site have resulted in deep trenches in some areas and mounds of dirt in others.

The "quietest" area of the site is 15-metres below the surface in the Seismic Isolation Pit. But not for long: GTM Construction will soon begin propping and formwork in preparation for concrete pouring for the B2 slab—the "upper basemat" and actual floor of the 360,000-tonne Tokamak Complex.

Work progresses on the Assembly Building basemat. Two sections of structural concrete, or plots, have been poured since November and reinforcement activities are ongoing. (Click to view larger version...)
Work progresses on the Assembly Building basemat. Two sections of structural concrete, or plots, have been poured since November and reinforcement activities are ongoing.


Workers dig galleries along the exterior of the Assembly Building to accommodate services (electricity, evacuation, piping ...) (Click to view larger version...)
Workers dig galleries along the exterior of the Assembly Building to accommodate services (electricity, evacuation, piping ...)


The foundations of the Assembly Building abut the retaining wall of the Tokamak Complex. The two buildings will be the tallest on the platform, rising to a height of 60 metres. (Click to view larger version...)
The foundations of the Assembly Building abut the retaining wall of the Tokamak Complex. The two buildings will be the tallest on the platform, rising to a height of 60 metres.


Propping and formwork will begin at the end of the month for the upper basemat of the Tokamak Pit: by late October 2013, the seismic protection system for the Tokamak Complex will be completely hidden from view. (Click to view larger version...)
Propping and formwork will begin at the end of the month for the upper basemat of the Tokamak Pit: by late October 2013, the seismic protection system for the Tokamak Complex will be completely hidden from view.


Critical network piping will crisscross the ITER site for precipitation drainage and cooling water release. In this section of the network, the pipes have been installed and backfilling is underway. (Click to view larger version...)
Critical network piping will crisscross the ITER site for precipitation drainage and cooling water release. In this section of the network, the pipes have been installed and backfilling is underway.




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