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Latest ITER Newsline

  • Divertor | Far more than a fancy ashtray

    It has been likened to the filter of a swimming pool or an oversized ashtray. It has been called alien in shape and hellish in its affinity for heat. But whatev [...]

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  • Council milestone #50 | The way to assembly is open

    Passing an ITER Council milestone is always an achievement. Passing this milestone at this moment is much more than that: it is a demonstration that, despite th [...]

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  • Deliveries | A third magnet ready for transport to ITER

    Three ITER magnets are now in transit to ITER from different points on the globe—two toroidal field magnets and one poloidal field coil. In terms of component w [...]

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  • Heaviest load yet | Europe's coil soon to hit the road

    It's big, it's heavy, it's precious and it's highly symbolic: the toroidal field coil that was unloaded at Marseille industrial harbour on 17 March is the most [...]

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  • Russia's ring coil | Entering the final sequence

    The smallest of ITER's poloidal field coils is entering the final sequence in a long series of activities that transform cable-in-conduit superconductor into a [...]

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Of Interest

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A symphony of particles

This four-minute video will take you into the very heart of the ITER Tokamak. (Click to view larger version...)
This four-minute video will take you into the very heart of the ITER Tokamak.
Have you ever wanted to visualize what happens inside of a tokamak?

In a spectacular new video on ITER operation produced by the National Center of Computational Sciences (located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, US), you can follow high-velocity deuterium particles as they are injected into the ITER plasma.

Against a backdrop of symphonic music played by the Czech National Symphony Orchestra, the particle density in the plasma begins to build, the injected particles start to collide with their lower-energy cousins, and their energy is transferred, heating the plasma and driving the plasma current. The conditions are ripe for fusion reactions, and a small Sun is created in the centre of the machine.

Produced from supercomputer simulations, the video will take you behind the walls and past the complex supporting systems for ITER, into the very heart of the fusion reaction.

Watch the video here.

"Fusion Energy Production by Deuterium Particle Injection" was funded in part by the US Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the National Center of Computational Sciences. (Visualization by Jamison Daniel.)


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