Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:


Please enter your email address:

@

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Worksite postcards | Under fog and autumn light

    Due to its proximity to the Durance River and to the narrow gully spanned by the Bridge of Mirabeau, the area around ITER often experiences a peculiar meteorolo [...]

    Read more

  • Assembly Hall | Another massive paint job

    By the end of December, the massive painting job in the Assembly Hall will be complete and the building's floor will be as white and pristine as the landscape i [...]

    Read more

  • ITER India | Testing a neutral beam for diagnostics

    Every 23 seconds during fusion operation, a probe beam will penetrate deep into the core of the ITER plasma to aid in the detection of helium ash—one of fusion' [...]

    Read more

  • Welded attachments | Follow the laser projections

    How do you position 150,000 welded attachments on to a vacuum vessel the size of a house, each one needing to be accurately placed to less than a 4 mm target? [...]

    Read more

  • Visit | Our neighbour the Nobel

    In 2018, the Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to Gérard Mourou for his work on ultra-short, extremely high-intensity laser pulses—the so-called 'chirped pulse [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived entries

Major milestone at NSTX spherical tokamak

John Greenwald, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Mission accomplished: The completed first section of the NSTX-U center stack capped months of demanding preparations and close teamwork. (Click to view larger version...)
Mission accomplished: The completed first section of the NSTX-U center stack capped months of demanding preparations and close teamwork.
"If we had a script, I couldn't think of a better outcome." That's how Ron Strykowsky, head of the NSTX Upgrade, described recent results for a critical stage of the project's construction. Riding on the outcome were months of work on the first quadrant of magnetic field conductors for the tokamak's new center stack, which forms the heart of the $94 million upgrade.

The crucial stage called for sealing and insulating the first quadrant through a volatile process known as vacuum pressure impregnation (VPI). Preparing the nine 20 foot-long, 350-pound (150 kilo) copper conductors for this step required the coordinated efforts of engineers and some dozen skilled technicians. The multiple tasks included soldering cooling tubes into the conductors under the direction of Steve Jurczynski, and sandblasting, priming and wrapping the units with fiberglass tape in operations led by Mike Anderson.

Read more on PPPL website.


return to the latest published articles