Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:

Please enter your email address:

@

Your email address will only be used for the purpose of sending you the ITER Organization publication(s) that you have requested. ITER Organization will not transfer your email address or other personal data to any other party or use it for commercial purposes.

If you change your mind, you can easily unsubscribe by clicking the unsubscribe option at the bottom of an email you've received from ITER Organization.

For more information, see our Privacy policy.

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Cryostat thermal shield | A "strong back" for a fragile component

    The lower cylinder thermal shield is a large silver-plated component, circular in shape and five metres tall, which fits inside the depression in the cryostat b [...]

    Read more

  • Diagnostic shielding | B4C ceramic bricks prove their worth

    A number of materials can effectively shield diagnostic equipment from the neutron flux coming from the plasma. To find the best one, the diagnostics team at IT [...]

    Read more

  • Image of the week | The cryostat top lid, batch after batch

    Batch after batch, the elements for the top lid of the ITER cryostat keep arriving from India. As of today, 7 out of the 12 required segments have been delivere [...]

    Read more

  • Cooling water system | The tanks within a tank

    Deep inside the bowels of the Tokamak Building, the entrance to one of most spectacular rooms of the whole installation resembles that of a broom cupboard. [...]

    Read more

  • ITER assembly | Last major assembly contract signed

    One year after finalizing two major machine assembly contracts, the ITER Organization has chosen the contractors who will carry out assembly and installation ac [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived entries

It's not rocket science!

A journalist with no formal science training, Jamy Gourmaud has developed a unique style to communicate science to the younger public. His secret? ''Always speak and act as if you were yourself the listener.'' (Click to view larger version...)
A journalist with no formal science training, Jamy Gourmaud has developed a unique style to communicate science to the younger public. His secret? ''Always speak and act as if you were yourself the listener.''
When Jamy explains, children in France listen ... fascinated. For the past 20 years his program C'est pas sorcier ("It's not rocket science") on French public television Channel 3 has opened their minds to the many wonders of the world.

From his makeshift "laboratory," Jamy and co-stars Sabine and Fred have explained the Earth and the Universe, the human body, mankind's greatest technological accomplishments, the origins of man, electricity and magnetism ... 550 programs in all watched by two generations of young people in France (and by their parents!). C'est pas sorcier demonstrated the educational role that TV can play and how science can be fun and exciting.

One thing Jamy had never had the opportunity to explain is fusion and ITER. Ever curious he decided to come and see for himself, paying a visit to the construction site in Saint-Paul-lez-Durance in early January.

Jamy's presence offered the ITER Communication team a great opportunity to compare notes on how to best disseminate science and promote large projects such as ITER. After hours of conversation, it all boiled down to a few simple principles: use a language understandable by a teenager, never explain something that you do not fully understand and, most important of all perhaps, always speak and act as if you were yourself the listener.

Watch an example of Jamy's program (in French) on electricity.

 


return to the latest published articles