Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:


Please enter your email address:

@

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • The physics behind the transition to H-mode

    H‐mode—or thesudden improvement of plasma confinement in the magnetic field of tokamaksby approximatelya factor of two—is thehigh confinement regime that all mo [...]

    Read more

  • In search of the green plasma

    Sébastien König's core competence is in planning and scheduling; his passion is in understanding the workings of the Universe. In his previous life, before join [...]

    Read more

  • An outing into the future

    Open Doors days occur with scientific regularity at ITER (spring and autumn) and yet—due to the rapid evolution of work on site—each event offers something new. [...]

    Read more

  • Fusion "grandfather" tells family story

    Grandfathers like to tell stories. And Robert Aymar, the 'grandfather' of the French fusion community, is no exception. 'Being so old,' he quipped at last week' [...]

    Read more

  • An AC/DC adapter ... ITER size

    Like flashlight and smartphones, the ITER magnets—all 10,000 tonnes of them—will run on direct current (DC). And like flashlight and smartphones they will need [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived articles

The bleeding "edge" of fusion research

-Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Part of a visualization of turbulence spreading inward from the plasma edge. (Click to view larger version...)
Part of a visualization of turbulence spreading inward from the plasma edge.
Few problems have vexed physicists like fusion, the process by which stars fuel themselves and by which researchers on Earth hope to create the energy source of the future.

By heating the hydrogen isotopes tritium and deuterium to more than five times the temperature of the Sun's core, scientists create a reaction that could eventually produce electricity. Turns out, however, that confining the engine of a star to a manmade vessel and using it to produce energy is tricky business.

Big problems, such as this one, require big solutions. Luckily, few solutions are bigger than Titan, the Department of Energy's flagship Cray XK7 supercomputer managed by the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility.

Titan allows advanced scientific applications to reach unprecedented speeds, enabling scientific breakthroughs faster than ever with only a marginal increase in power consumption. This unique marriage of number-crunching hardware enables Titan, located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), to reach a peak performance of 27 petaflops to claim the title of the world's fastest computer dedicated solely to scientific research.

See the original article and the computer visualization on the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility website.


return to the latest published articles