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Latest ITER Newsline

  • Video | How does the ITER cryoplant work?

    Cold is essential to ITER—10,000 tonnes of superconducting magnets, the thermal shield that surrounds the machine, the cryopumps that achieve the high vacuum in [...]

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  • Component logistics | Consistency "from the cradle to the grave"

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  • Image of the week | Brewing storm

    In Provence, one gets tired of blue skies... so when the opportunity arises to capture the ITER site plunged in the darkness of an approaching storm, we rush to [...]

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  • Toroidal field coils | First cold test in Europe

    The first ITER toroidal field coil winding pack has spent nearly 20 days in a specially conceived cryostat at minus 193 °C (80 K), in a cold testing operation t [...]

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  • Central solenoid | All conductor received

    Officials from the US and Japanese fusion energy programs were at General Atomics' Magnet Technologies Center in California in early May to celebrate the delive [...]

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Of Interest

See archived articles

The bleeding "edge" of fusion research

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Part of a visualization of turbulence spreading inward from the plasma edge. (Click to view larger version...)
Part of a visualization of turbulence spreading inward from the plasma edge.
Few problems have vexed physicists like fusion, the process by which stars fuel themselves and by which researchers on Earth hope to create the energy source of the future.

By heating the hydrogen isotopes tritium and deuterium to more than five times the temperature of the Sun's core, scientists create a reaction that could eventually produce electricity. Turns out, however, that confining the engine of a star to a manmade vessel and using it to produce energy is tricky business.

Big problems, such as this one, require big solutions. Luckily, few solutions are bigger than Titan, the Department of Energy's flagship Cray XK7 supercomputer managed by the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility.

Titan allows advanced scientific applications to reach unprecedented speeds, enabling scientific breakthroughs faster than ever with only a marginal increase in power consumption. This unique marriage of number-crunching hardware enables Titan, located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), to reach a peak performance of 27 petaflops to claim the title of the world's fastest computer dedicated solely to scientific research.

See the original article and the computer visualization on the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility website.


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