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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Making remote handling less remote

    Over a wet and windy three-day period on the ITER site in November, around 90 representatives of the ITER Organization, the Domestic Agencies of Europe and Japa [...]

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  • The framework for sharing ITER intellectual property

    In signing the ITER Agreement in 2006, the seven ITER Members were agreeing not only to share in the costs of constructing and operating the ITER facility, but [...]

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  • Wendelstein achieves ultra-precise magnetic topology

    A recent article in the online journal Nature Communications confirms that the complex topology of the magnetic field of Wendelstein 7-X—the world's largest ste [...]

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  • The Matrix, rigid and fluid

    A fast-growing array of structures and buildings has been emerging across the ITER worksite platform under the control and supervision of the European Domestic [...]

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  • By road, river and sea

    They travelled by road from the Air Liquide factory near Grenoble, sailed down the Rhône River from Lyon and entered the Mediterranean to the east of Fos-sur-Me [...]

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Of Interest

See archived articles

Two out of five and standing tall already

Two levels out of five and the pillars already stand tall on the platform. As the Assembly Building's steel skeleton is progressively bolted into place, the massive size of the construction becomes more and more evident.

Bolting together column sections, weighing as much as 23 tons, is a delicate manual operation. All in all, 220 sections will be assembled to form the building's east and west walls. (Click to view larger version...)
Bolting together column sections, weighing as much as 23 tons, is a delicate manual operation. All in all, 220 sections will be assembled to form the building's east and west walls.

Work on the structure began in September 2014. In April, when columns on both side of the slab have reached half their nominal height, workers will begin assembling the roof on the ground.

Once the roof has been fully assembled and the columns have reached their full height (approximately 60 metres), the frame of the roof can be lifted and bolted to the structure.

The installation of the crane rails will follow. The delivery of the supersized cranes designed to handle the heaviest ITER components is planned for the end of the year.



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