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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • The physics behind the transition to H-mode

    H‐mode—or thesudden improvement of plasma confinement in the magnetic field of tokamaksby approximatelya factor of two—is thehigh confinement regime that all mo [...]

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  • In search of the green plasma

    Sébastien König's core competence is in planning and scheduling; his passion is in understanding the workings of the Universe. In his previous life, before join [...]

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  • An outing into the future

    Open Doors days occur with scientific regularity at ITER (spring and autumn) and yet—due to the rapid evolution of work on site—each event offers something new. [...]

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  • Fusion "grandfather" tells family story

    Grandfathers like to tell stories. And Robert Aymar, the 'grandfather' of the French fusion community, is no exception. 'Being so old,' he quipped at last week' [...]

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  • An AC/DC adapter ... ITER size

    Like flashlight and smartphones, the ITER magnets—all 10,000 tonnes of them—will run on direct current (DC). And like flashlight and smartphones they will need [...]

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Of Interest

See archived articles

Two out of five and standing tall already

Two levels out of five and the pillars already stand tall on the platform. As the Assembly Building's steel skeleton is progressively bolted into place, the massive size of the construction becomes more and more evident.

Bolting together column sections, weighing as much as 23 tonnes, is a delicate manual operation. All in all, 220 sections will be assembled to form the building's east and west walls. (Click to view larger version...)
Bolting together column sections, weighing as much as 23 tonnes, is a delicate manual operation. All in all, 220 sections will be assembled to form the building's east and west walls.

Work on the structure began in September 2014. In April, when columns on both side of the slab have reached half their nominal height, workers will begin assembling the roof on the ground.

Once the roof has been fully assembled and the columns have reached their full height (approximately 60 metres), the frame of the roof can be lifted and bolted to the structure.

The installation of the crane rails will follow. The delivery of the supersized cranes designed to handle the heaviest ITER components is planned for the end of the year.



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