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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Heating | A pinch of moondust in the ITER plasma

    One day in the distant future, fusion plants might be fuelled by helium 3—an isotope that is extremely scarce on Earth but reputed to be abundant on the Moon. B [...]

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  • Delivery | 2,000 km through canals, locks and tunnels

    When the thruway is closed, one takes the back roads. And when it's low-water season on the Rhine-Rhône canal, a barge leaving Switzerland for the Mediterranean [...]

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  • Monaco Fellows | A hand in shaping ITER

    For the sixth time, ITER is welcoming a group of five young researchers as part of the Monaco-ITER postdoctoral fellowship scheme. Working alongside experienced [...]

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  • On site | Drone survey on a perfect day

    There are days in winter when the skies over Provence are perfectly transparent. Snowy peaks 200 kilometres away appear close enough to be touched and farms, co [...]

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  • AAAS conference | ITER on the world science stage

    With more than 120,000 members globally, the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) is billed as the world's largest scientific society. The [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

Two out of five and standing tall already

Two levels out of five and the pillars already stand tall on the platform. As the Assembly Building's steel skeleton is progressively bolted into place, the massive size of the construction becomes more and more evident.

Bolting together column sections, weighing as much as 23 tonnes, is a delicate manual operation. All in all, 220 sections will be assembled to form the building's east and west walls. (Click to view larger version...)
Bolting together column sections, weighing as much as 23 tonnes, is a delicate manual operation. All in all, 220 sections will be assembled to form the building's east and west walls.

Work on the structure began in September 2014. In April, when columns on both side of the slab have reached half their nominal height, workers will begin assembling the roof on the ground.

Once the roof has been fully assembled and the columns have reached their full height (approximately 60 metres), the frame of the roof can be lifted and bolted to the structure.

The installation of the crane rails will follow. The delivery of the supersized cranes designed to handle the heaviest ITER components is planned for the end of the year.



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