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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Heating | A pinch of moondust in the ITER plasma

    One day in the distant future, fusion plants might be fuelled by helium 3—an isotope that is extremely scarce on Earth but reputed to be abundant on the Moon. B [...]

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  • Delivery | 2,000 km through canals, locks and tunnels

    When the thruway is closed, one takes the back roads. And when it's low-water season on the Rhine-Rhône canal, a barge leaving Switzerland for the Mediterranean [...]

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  • Monaco Fellows | A hand in shaping ITER

    For the sixth time, ITER is welcoming a group of five young researchers as part of the Monaco-ITER postdoctoral fellowship scheme. Working alongside experienced [...]

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  • On site | Drone survey on a perfect day

    There are days in winter when the skies over Provence are perfectly transparent. Snowy peaks 200 kilometres away appear close enough to be touched and farms, co [...]

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  • AAAS conference | ITER on the world science stage

    With more than 120,000 members globally, the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) is billed as the world's largest scientific society. The [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

Right on time for the eclipse

Arriving from Santander, Spain, the convoy passed the gate to the ITER storage area at the very moment the eclipse reached its maximum. As a dull, ashen light fell on the surrounding countryside, the truck and its load came to a halt—the first equipment procured by the European Domestic Agency had safely reached its destination.

The load that was delivered on Friday 20 March is one of two emergency tanks that will collect tritiated water in the case of an abnormal situation during operation (the second will be delivered in April). (Click to view larger version...)
The load that was delivered on Friday 20 March is one of two emergency tanks that will collect tritiated water in the case of an abnormal situation during operation (the second will be delivered in April).
Manufactured by the Spanish company ENSA, the load consisted of a 20-tonne, 100 m³ tank destined for the ITER detritiation system. It is one of two "emergency tanks" that will collect the tritiated water in case an abnormal situation develops during operations (the second will be delivered in April).

The tank that was delivered on 20 March will be the first Safety Important Component to be installed in the Tokamak Complex. "The fact that the emergency tanks are being delivered now means that we will be able to install them before the next level is poured," explained Manfred Glugla, head of the ITER Fuel Cycle Engineering Division.

Representatives of the European Domestic Agency, ITER Organization, and ENSA celebrating the arrival of the 20-tonne tank at the ITER site. (Click to view larger version...)
Representatives of the European Domestic Agency, ITER Organization, and ENSA celebrating the arrival of the 20-tonne tank at the ITER site.
Five other tanks (one other emergency tank and 4 four-tonne, 20 m³ storage tanks) manufactured by ENSA will be delivered in the coming months on behalf of the European Domestic Agency to equip ITER's water detritiation system.

Read more about the function of the water detritiation tanks on the European Domestic Agency website.



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