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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • ITER DNA | A "case" study...

    In December last year, and again this year in early May, pre-welding fitting tests demonstrated that steel components as tall as a four-storey building (and wei [...]

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  • First plasma| Temporary in-vessel protection

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  • Divertor cassettes | Successful prototypes open way to series

    Before embarking on the fabrication of the 54 complex steel structures that will form a ring at the bottom of the ITER machine—the divertor cassettes—the Europe [...]

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  • Images of the week | Titan tool 90 percent complete

    Towering 22 metres above ground and weighing approximately 800 tonnes, the twin sector sub-assembly tools (SSAT) are formidable handling machines that will be u [...]

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  • Video | How does the ITER cryoplant work?

    Cold is essential to ITER—10,000 tonnes of superconducting magnets, the thermal shield that surrounds the machine, the cryopumps that achieve the high vacuum in [...]

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Of Interest

See archived articles

Right on time for the eclipse

Arriving from Santander, Spain, the convoy passed the gate to the ITER storage area at the very moment the eclipse reached its maximum. As a dull, ashen light fell on the surrounding countryside, the truck and its load came to a halt—the first equipment procured by the European Domestic Agency had safely reached its destination.

The load that was delivered on Friday 20 March is one of two emergency tanks that will collect tritiated water in the case of an abnormal situation during operation (the second will be delivered in April). (Click to view larger version...)
The load that was delivered on Friday 20 March is one of two emergency tanks that will collect tritiated water in the case of an abnormal situation during operation (the second will be delivered in April).
Manufactured by the Spanish company ENSA, the load consisted of a 20-tonne, 100 m³ tank destined for the ITER detritiation system. It is one of two "emergency tanks" that will collect the tritiated water in case an abnormal situation develops during operations (the second will be delivered in April).

The tank that was delivered on 20 March will be the first Safety Important Component to be installed in the Tokamak Complex. "The fact that the emergency tanks are being delivered now means that we will be able to install them before the next level is poured," explained Manfred Glugla, head of the ITER Fuel Cycle Engineering Division.

Representatives of the European Domestic Agency, ITER Organization, and ENSA celebrating the arrival of the 20-tonne tank at the ITER site. (Click to view larger version...)
Representatives of the European Domestic Agency, ITER Organization, and ENSA celebrating the arrival of the 20-tonne tank at the ITER site.
Five other tanks (one other emergency tank and 4 four-tonne, 20 m³ storage tanks) manufactured by ENSA will be delivered in the coming months on behalf of the European Domestic Agency to equip ITER's water detritiation system.

Read more about the function of the water detritiation tanks on the European Domestic Agency website.



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