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Latest ITER Newsline

  • Crane operator | A cabin in the sky

    There are times, at dusk, when the ITER construction platform resembles an airport, with roads and buildings illuminated by yellow and white lights. From their [...]

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  • Assembly | A colossal task made manageable

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  • Neutral Beam Test Facility | A new agreement for a new era

    The ITER Organization and the Italian consortium Consorzio RFX* have signed a new agreement governing the construction and operation of the ITER Neutral Beam Te [...]

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  • Load tests | Heavyweight champion

    The Assembly Hall, with its two giant tools towering 20 metres above ground, is one of the most spectacular locations on the ITER site. When a dummy load weighi [...]

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  • Fusion's new pioneers | How to go fast enough to make a difference

    Last month in New York, the Stellar Energy Foundation and the Fusion Industry Association co-hosted an invitation-only workshop: 'Roadmap to the Fusion Energy E [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

Right on time for the eclipse

Arriving from Santander, Spain, the convoy passed the gate to the ITER storage area at the very moment the eclipse reached its maximum. As a dull, ashen light fell on the surrounding countryside, the truck and its load came to a halt—the first equipment procured by the European Domestic Agency had safely reached its destination.

The load that was delivered on Friday 20 March is one of two emergency tanks that will collect tritiated water in the case of an abnormal situation during operation (the second will be delivered in April). (Click to view larger version...)
The load that was delivered on Friday 20 March is one of two emergency tanks that will collect tritiated water in the case of an abnormal situation during operation (the second will be delivered in April).
Manufactured by the Spanish company ENSA, the load consisted of a 20-tonne, 100 m³ tank destined for the ITER detritiation system. It is one of two "emergency tanks" that will collect the tritiated water in case an abnormal situation develops during operations (the second will be delivered in April).

The tank that was delivered on 20 March will be the first Safety Important Component to be installed in the Tokamak Complex. "The fact that the emergency tanks are being delivered now means that we will be able to install them before the next level is poured," explained Manfred Glugla, head of the ITER Fuel Cycle Engineering Division.

Representatives of the European Domestic Agency, ITER Organization, and ENSA celebrating the arrival of the 20-tonne tank at the ITER site. (Click to view larger version...)
Representatives of the European Domestic Agency, ITER Organization, and ENSA celebrating the arrival of the 20-tonne tank at the ITER site.
Five other tanks (one other emergency tank and 4 four-tonne, 20 m³ storage tanks) manufactured by ENSA will be delivered in the coming months on behalf of the European Domestic Agency to equip ITER's water detritiation system.

Read more about the function of the water detritiation tanks on the European Domestic Agency website.



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