Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:


Please enter your email address:

@

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Magnets | CEA delivers ITER cryogenic instrumentation

    The ITER Organization has relied on the French CEA institute and its expertise in cryogenics and large superconducting magnets for the specialized instrumentati [...]

    Read more

  • Sector sub-assembly | Twin meets twin

    Although they were born one full year apart, they are identical twins: when the second vacuum vessel sector sub-assembly tool (SSAT-2) is complete, nothing will [...]

    Read more

  • R&D in Europe | Working with industry on digital hydraulics

    A contract signed with the European Domestic Agency is helping Finnish industry innovate in the domain of digital hydraulic valves. The result could interest IT [...]

    Read more

  • Diagnostics | What is the plasma shape? Ask the flux loop

    Inside the machine, the flux loop diagnostic will provide important information to operators on the boundary shape, energy and stability of the plasma. In ITE [...]

    Read more

  • Image of the week | Communicators of all countries, unite!

    ITER is a fascinating story to tell—how it began and how it developed, the challenges it has never ceased to face, the awe its infrastructure and components ins [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived entries

Deuterium provides clue to Mars's wet past

Another Blue Planet? Yes ... some four billion years ago. © ESO (Click to view larger version...)
Another Blue Planet? Yes ... some four billion years ago. © ESO
By comparing the ratio of "heavy water" (in which one hydrogen atom is replaced by its heavier isotope deuterium) to "normal water" in the atmosphere of Mars, scientists at NASA and the European Southern Observatory (ESO) have come to the conclusion that the Red Planet was once home to a large ocean that covered a greater portion of the planet's surface than the Atlantic Ocean does on Earth.

The international team of scientists used ESO's Very Large Telescope, along with instruments at the W. M. Keck Observatory and the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility, to monitor the atmosphere of the planet and map out the properties of the water in different parts of Mars's atmosphere over a six-year period.

"Our study provides a solid estimate of how much water Mars once had, by determining how much water was lost to space," said Geronimo Villanueva, a scientist working at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, USA, and lead author of the new paper. "With this work, we can better understand the history of water on Mars."

Watch NASA's video and read more on the ESO website.


return to the latest published articles