Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:


Please enter your email address:

@

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Pre-compression ring facility | Ready to exert serious pressure

    The tool is ready; the first prototypes are on their way. Soon, a specialized test bench at CNIM (France) will enter into service to verify the resistance of th [...]

    Read more

  • Internal auditor | A partner in identifying solutions

    ITER's new internal auditor Friedrich Lincke goes where his expertise is needed to make a difference. Armed with valuable experience from many years of service [...]

    Read more

  • Sub-assembly tools | A 12-tonne beam, a crane and a little push

    There is nothing remarkable about lifting a 12-tonne beam. Except when it happens in the spectacular setting of the ITER Assembly Hall, and the beam needs to be [...]

    Read more

  • Hiring | Skilled candidates wanted

    In 2018 the number of staff members employed by the ITER Organization increased to 858, as skilled and qualified candidates joined from each of the seven ITER M [...]

    Read more

  • Toroidal field coils | First ITER magnet arrives this year

    A major milepost is projected for 2019 as the first of ITER's powerful, high-field magnets is scheduled to arrive from Japan. Let's take a look behind the scene [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived entries

W7-X stellarator : the step-by-step march toward first plasma

Isabella Milch, Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik

Preparing a fusion device for first plasma is a step-by-step, carefully monitored process. In the last two months at Wendelstein 7-X, superconducting temperatures of 4 K were achieved, the vessel was sealed tight, and evacuation (to create a vacuum) began. In May, the magnets will be tested for the first time under power. Photo: IPP, Torsten Bräuer (Click to view larger version...)
Preparing a fusion device for first plasma is a step-by-step, carefully monitored process. In the last two months at Wendelstein 7-X, superconducting temperatures of 4 K were achieved, the vessel was sealed tight, and evacuation (to create a vacuum) began. In May, the magnets will be tested for the first time under power. Photo: IPP, Torsten Bräuer
Preparations for the operation of the Wendelstein 7-X fusion device in Greifswald, Germany are in full swing. In advance of the decisive magnet cooling stage many preparatory steps have been carried out, including the cleaning and flushing of the numerous helium cooling pipes and the start-up of the cryoplant (which had undergone thorough testing at an earlier date). 

On 13 February the gradual cooling of the cryoplant got off to a start. All systems were carefully monitored during the step-by-step process, with particular attention to checking for leaks in the piping or cooling systems.

Four weeks later, on 10 March, the target temperature of 4 K was attained—an essential milestone, as well as a prerequisite, for superconductivity in the magnets. Verifications will still take some time yet; presumably in May the magnets will be tested for the first time under power.

On 12 March the last ports in the plasma vessel were sealed vacuum-tight and evacuation of the vessel could begin. In addition to readying diagnostic equipment and working on switchgear and cabling, the verification of leak-tightness in the numerous connections and seals is proceeding. 

A "first plasma" in Wendelstein 7-X is expected by the end of 2015, at the latest.

Read the original article on the IPP website.


return to the latest published articles