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Latest ITER Newsline

  • Video | How does the ITER cryoplant work?

    Cold is essential to ITER—10,000 tonnes of superconducting magnets, the thermal shield that surrounds the machine, the cryopumps that achieve the high vacuum in [...]

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  • Component logistics | Consistency "from the cradle to the grave"

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  • Image of the week | Brewing storm

    In Provence, one gets tired of blue skies... so when the opportunity arises to capture the ITER site plunged in the darkness of an approaching storm, we rush to [...]

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  • Toroidal field coils | First cold test in Europe

    The first ITER toroidal field coil winding pack has spent nearly 20 days in a specially conceived cryostat at minus 193 °C (80 K), in a cold testing operation t [...]

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  • Central solenoid | All conductor received

    Officials from the US and Japanese fusion energy programs were at General Atomics' Magnet Technologies Center in California in early May to celebrate the delive [...]

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Of Interest

See archived articles

Strip off the concrete

Ingo Kuehn & Mikka Kotamaki, Design Integration Section

Big city lights or fusion facility? This illustration shows the openings and penetrations implemented in the Tokamak Complex buildings configuration model (2010). (Click to view larger version...)
Big city lights or fusion facility? This illustration shows the openings and penetrations implemented in the Tokamak Complex buildings configuration model (2010).
As an example of a typical auxiliary building CMM, here is the model of Site Services Building 61—with all the walls hidden to show the plant systems inside the building. (Click to view larger version...)
As an example of a typical auxiliary building CMM, here is the model of Site Services Building 61—with all the walls hidden to show the plant systems inside the building.
What an unattractive expression for something that is almost artistic: a configuration management model (CMM) describes the required space envelope needed by a system or component taking into account space for maintenance, assembly, inspection and the interfaces with other systems and the buildings.

Recently, significant progress was made by the System Engineering Support team led by Thibault Tsedri in collecting and defining approximately 800 required openings and penetrations in the walls and floor slabs in the Tokamak Complex buildings.

The completion of all the models was a necessary part of confirming that the size and layout of each building is adequate and appropriate for the accommodation of all plant systems. CMMs will also provide the Architect Engineering (AE) contractor with all the necessary information to start the preliminary design of the buildings.

The ultimate milestone will be the signature of the AE contract that will take place on the ITER site next Tuesday, 13 April.



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