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  • Crane operator | A cabin in the sky

    There are times, at dusk, when the ITER construction platform resembles an airport, with roads and buildings illuminated by yellow and white lights. From their [...]

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  • Assembly | A colossal task made manageable

    For the execution of work during the next project phase—machine and plant assembly up to First Plasma—the ITER Organization has chosen a contractual approach th [...]

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  • Neutral Beam Test Facility | A new agreement for a new era

    The ITER Organization and the Italian consortium Consorzio RFX* have signed a new agreement governing the construction and operation of the ITER Neutral Beam Te [...]

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  • Load tests | Heavyweight champion

    The Assembly Hall, with its two giant tools towering 20 metres above ground, is one of the most spectacular locations on the ITER site. When a dummy load weighi [...]

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  • Fusion's new pioneers | How to go fast enough to make a difference

    Last month in New York, the Stellar Energy Foundation and the Fusion Industry Association co-hosted an invitation-only workshop: 'Roadmap to the Fusion Energy E [...]

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Of Interest

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Strip off the concrete

Ingo Kuehn & Mikka Kotamaki, Design Integration Section

Big city lights or fusion facility? This illustration shows the openings and penetrations implemented in the Tokamak Complex buildings configuration model (2010). (Click to view larger version...)
Big city lights or fusion facility? This illustration shows the openings and penetrations implemented in the Tokamak Complex buildings configuration model (2010).
As an example of a typical auxiliary building CMM, here is the model of Site Services Building 61—with all the walls hidden to show the plant systems inside the building. (Click to view larger version...)
As an example of a typical auxiliary building CMM, here is the model of Site Services Building 61—with all the walls hidden to show the plant systems inside the building.
What an unattractive expression for something that is almost artistic: a configuration management model (CMM) describes the required space envelope needed by a system or component taking into account space for maintenance, assembly, inspection and the interfaces with other systems and the buildings.

Recently, significant progress was made by the System Engineering Support team led by Thibault Tsedri in collecting and defining approximately 800 required openings and penetrations in the walls and floor slabs in the Tokamak Complex buildings.

The completion of all the models was a necessary part of confirming that the size and layout of each building is adequate and appropriate for the accommodation of all plant systems. CMMs will also provide the Architect Engineering (AE) contractor with all the necessary information to start the preliminary design of the buildings.

The ultimate milestone will be the signature of the AE contract that will take place on the ITER site next Tuesday, 13 April.



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