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Latest ITER Newsline

  • In-vessel electrical systems | What it takes to wire up a fusion reactor

    While the challenges of keeping cables operational in harsh environments such as jet engines and nuclear fission reactors have been understood for a long time, [...]

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  • Assembly preparation | Off goes the lid

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  • Deliveries | Two coils on their way

    For the past five years, 'highly exceptional loads' (HEL) have been successfully travelling along the ITER Itinerary to be delivered to the ITER site. As the pr [...]

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  • ITER NOW video | Ready for the big lifts

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  • Divertor | Far more than a fancy ashtray

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Of Interest

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Strip off the concrete

Ingo Kuehn & Mikka Kotamaki, Design Integration Section

Big city lights or fusion facility? This illustration shows the openings and penetrations implemented in the Tokamak Complex buildings configuration model (2010). (Click to view larger version...)
Big city lights or fusion facility? This illustration shows the openings and penetrations implemented in the Tokamak Complex buildings configuration model (2010).
As an example of a typical auxiliary building CMM, here is the model of Site Services Building 61—with all the walls hidden to show the plant systems inside the building. (Click to view larger version...)
As an example of a typical auxiliary building CMM, here is the model of Site Services Building 61—with all the walls hidden to show the plant systems inside the building.
What an unattractive expression for something that is almost artistic: a configuration management model (CMM) describes the required space envelope needed by a system or component taking into account space for maintenance, assembly, inspection and the interfaces with other systems and the buildings.

Recently, significant progress was made by the System Engineering Support team led by Thibault Tsedri in collecting and defining approximately 800 required openings and penetrations in the walls and floor slabs in the Tokamak Complex buildings.

The completion of all the models was a necessary part of confirming that the size and layout of each building is adequate and appropriate for the accommodation of all plant systems. CMMs will also provide the Architect Engineering (AE) contractor with all the necessary information to start the preliminary design of the buildings.

The ultimate milestone will be the signature of the AE contract that will take place on the ITER site next Tuesday, 13 April.



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