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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Question of the week | Will fusion run out of fuel?

    One of the paradoxes of fusion, the virtually inexhaustible energy of the future, is that it relies on an element that does not exist—or just barely. Tritium, o [...]

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  • Managing data | Setting up a robust process

    Are the ITER systems and processes robust enough to manage the technical and project data for a program of ITER's complexity? Will quality information be made a [...]

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  • Image of the week | Bullseye

    Two perfectly circular structures, looking a lot like archery targets, have been installed on the west-facing wall of the Tokamak Complex. They are not for sh [...]

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  • Art and science | Seeking new perspectives on fusion

    Standing in the middle of the Tokamak Building, sound artist Julian Weaver positions his 3D microphone near one of the openings of the bioshield to record the s [...]

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  • Worksite photos | The view one never tires of

    For the past three-and a half years, ITER Communication has been documenting construction progress from the top of the tallest crane on the ITER worksite. Altho [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

International media on the ITER front

Sabina Griffith

Once a year, the ITER Organization invites representatives of the international media for a two-day on site program. On 18-19 May, 60 international science journalists from 19 countries accepted the 2015 invitation. (Click to view larger version...)
Once a year, the ITER Organization invites representatives of the international media for a two-day on site program. On 18-19 May, 60 international science journalists from 19 countries accepted the 2015 invitation.
It's not an easy proposition, to write a 700-word article on one of the largest international science collaborations in the history of mankind. Each aspect of ITER—the working of its international collaboration, its science, its technology, and its construction status—would easily fill pages.

Once a year, the ITER Organization invites representatives of the international media for a two-day on site program in order to lift the curtain and provide access to construction underway, top ITER specialists, and first-hand information on project status.

Asked about his strategy ITER Director-General Bernard Bigot replied that it was his personal goal ''to improve the decision-making processes within this organization and to make it more efficient.'' (Click to view larger version...)
Asked about his strategy ITER Director-General Bernard Bigot replied that it was his personal goal ''to improve the decision-making processes within this organization and to make it more efficient.''
On 18-19 May, 60 international science journalists from 19 countries, including Canada, China, Europe, Japan, Korea, Russia, and the US, accepted this year's invitation. During the two-day event they had opportunities, both formal and informal, to meet with representatives from the ITER Organization and its Domestic Agencies, they toured the construction site, saw ITER in 3D and visited the Tore-Supra tokamak at the neighbouring CEA research facility.

At the end of the first day they were addressed by the ITER Director-General Bernard Bigot. "The project is funded by public money and this is why we are in the public interest." Asked about his strategy now that he is at the helm of the ITER Project, Bigot replied that it was his personal goal "to improve the decision-making processes within this organization and to make it more efficient. We are working now to make timely decisions and to better integrate the scientific and industrial capacities of the seven ITER Members. All together, we have a unique opportunity—and there will be only one—to carry out this important scientific demonstration."

View a slide show of Press Trip below.


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