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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • 23rd ITER Council | Pace and performance on track

    Working as an integrated team, the ITER Organization and seven Domestic Agencies are continuing to meet the project's demanding schedule to First Plasma in 2025 [...]

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  • Huffing and puffing | Testing the endurance of steering mirrors

    On the computer screen, a set of three metal bellows 'breathe' in a steady rhythm. Nuclear engineer Natalia Casal and materials engineer Toshimichi Omori are on [...]

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  • ITER R&D | News from the Neutral Beam Test Facility

    At Consorzio RFX, where ITER's most powerful external heating system will be tested in advance, activities are progressing well on two distinct test beds. ITE [...]

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  • Vacuum vessel welding | Rehearsing a grand production

    There is a place near Santander, Spain, where one can actually feel what ITER will be like. Although we've seen dozens of drawings and 3D animations, the encoun [...]

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  • Image of the week | A plasma-enlightened training course

    The Vacuum Section hosted approximately 40 people last week from the ITER Organization and the Domestic Agencies for a two-day training session on vacuum. [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

Hot times for fusion plasmas

Fusion plasmas make the front cover of the latest issue of Physics Today (October 2015). (Click to view larger version...)
Fusion plasmas make the front cover of the latest issue of Physics Today (October 2015).
In the October issue of Physics Today, three US researchers
report on recent advances in the understanding of wave-particle physics in tokamaks.

In fusion plasmas, interactions between electromagnetic waves and the most energetic ions can perturb ion orbits enough to expel them from the confining magnetic field, resulting in loss of performance. A better understanding of energetic ion behavior in tokamaks is needed to predict and produce the operating parameters required for a fusion reactor.

Based on experiments and simulations of wave-induced ion transport, researchers David Pace (General Atomics), Bill Heidbrink (University of California, Irvine) and Michael Van Zeeland (General Atomics) have supplied new details on the process. Continued development of wave-particle physics will arm researchers with the ability to predict, and then avoid or mitigate, scenarios at ITER in which alpha particles are transported out of their confined orbits in the plasma.

Read the full article at AIP Scitation.
A pdf version of the article can also be downloaded from the General Atomics website.


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