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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • The magnet lab next door

    Two and a half years ago ITER and the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) entered a collaborationto prepare for the challenging task [...]

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  • Activity on every floor

    At every floor of the Tokamak Complex—from the lowest underground level (B2) all the way to the second regular level of the bioshield (L2)—there is intense acti [...]

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  • Bringing the Research Plan up to date

    The ITER Research Plan is an ITER baseline document which outlines the main lines of science and technology research derived from the project's mission goals. [...]

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  • Further validation for ring magnet fabrication

    Once a component mockup has been produced—and before fabrication can begin on the actual component or system—a manufacturing readiness review is required to ens [...]

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  • First central solenoid module ready for heat treatment

    In a major milestone, the US contractor responsible for the fabrication of the ITER central solenoid has successfully joined seven individual coil sections, or [...]

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Of Interest

See archived articles

Hot times for fusion plasmas

Fusion plasmas make the front cover of the latest issue of Physics Today (October 2015). (Click to view larger version...)
Fusion plasmas make the front cover of the latest issue of Physics Today (October 2015).
In the October issue of Physics Today, three US researchers
report on recent advances in the understanding of wave-particle physics in tokamaks.

In fusion plasmas, interactions between electromagnetic waves and the most energetic ions can perturb ion orbits enough to expel them from the confining magnetic field, resulting in loss of performance. A better understanding of energetic ion behavior in tokamaks is needed to predict and produce the operating parameters required for a fusion reactor.

Based on experiments and simulations of wave-induced ion transport, researchers David Pace (General Atomics), Bill Heidbrink (University of California, Irvine) and Michael Van Zeeland (General Atomics) have supplied new details on the process. Continued development of wave-particle physics will arm researchers with the ability to predict, and then avoid or mitigate, scenarios at ITER in which alpha particles are transported out of their confined orbits in the plasma.

Read the full article at AIP Scitation.
A pdf version of the article can also be downloaded from the General Atomics website.


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