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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Making remote handling less remote

    Over a wet and windy three-day period on the ITER site in November, around 90 representatives of the ITER Organization, the Domestic Agencies of Europe and Japa [...]

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  • The framework for sharing ITER intellectual property

    In signing the ITER Agreement in 2006, the seven ITER Members were agreeing not only to share in the costs of constructing and operating the ITER facility, but [...]

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  • Wendelstein achieves ultra-precise magnetic topology

    A recent article in the online journal Nature Communications confirms that the complex topology of the magnetic field of Wendelstein 7-X—the world's largest ste [...]

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  • The Matrix, rigid and fluid

    A fast-growing array of structures and buildings has been emerging across the ITER worksite platform under the control and supervision of the European Domestic [...]

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  • By road, river and sea

    They travelled by road from the Air Liquide factory near Grenoble, sailed down the Rhône River from Lyon and entered the Mediterranean to the east of Fos-sur-Me [...]

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Of Interest

See archived articles

Hot times for fusion plasmas

Fusion plasmas make the front cover of the latest issue of Physics Today (October 2015). (Click to view larger version...)
Fusion plasmas make the front cover of the latest issue of Physics Today (October 2015).
In the October issue of Physics Today, three US researchers
report on recent advances in the understanding of wave-particle physics in tokamaks.

In fusion plasmas, interactions between electromagnetic waves and the most energetic ions can perturb ion orbits enough to expel them from the confining magnetic field, resulting in loss of performance. A better understanding of energetic ion behavior in tokamaks is needed to predict and produce the operating parameters required for a fusion reactor.

Based on experiments and simulations of wave-induced ion transport, researchers David Pace (General Atomics), Bill Heidbrink (University of California, Irvine) and Michael Van Zeeland (General Atomics) have supplied new details on the process. Continued development of wave-particle physics will arm researchers with the ability to predict, and then avoid or mitigate, scenarios at ITER in which alpha particles are transported out of their confined orbits in the plasma.

Read the full article at AIP Scitation.
A pdf version of the article can also be downloaded from the General Atomics website.


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