Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:


Please enter your email address:

@

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • The crown's jewels

    They are the jewels of the concrete crown that will support the combined mass of the Tokamak and its surrounding cryostat: 18 perfectly polished, chrome-plated [...]

    Read more

  • "Making the best of fusion installations in Europe"

    With the recent addition of the Ukraine's Kharkov Institute for Physics and Technology (KIPT), the EUROfusion consortium now encompasses 30 European fusion labo [...]

    Read more

  • New cryostat manufacturing milestone

    They all gathered—members of the ITER-India team and contractor Larsen & Toubro—to mark a portentous moment: the start of manufacturing on the upper cylinde [...]

    Read more

  • Key power supply elements pass tests in Russia

    Since the signature of a Procurement Arrangement in 2011 with Russia for switching networks, fast discharge units, DC busbars and instrumentation—all key elemen [...]

    Read more

  • First vessel subassembly achieved in Europe

    Nine massive steel sectors deliveredby the Domestic Agencies of Europe (five sectors) and Korea (four sectors) will be welded together on site during the assemb [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived articles

Hot times for fusion plasmas

Fusion plasmas make the front cover of the latest issue of Physics Today (October 2015). (Click to view larger version...)
Fusion plasmas make the front cover of the latest issue of Physics Today (October 2015).
In the October issue of Physics Today, three US researchers
report on recent advances in the understanding of wave-particle physics in tokamaks.

In fusion plasmas, interactions between electromagnetic waves and the most energetic ions can perturb ion orbits enough to expel them from the confining magnetic field, resulting in loss of performance. A better understanding of energetic ion behavior in tokamaks is needed to predict and produce the operating parameters required for a fusion reactor.

Based on experiments and simulations of wave-induced ion transport, researchers David Pace (General Atomics), Bill Heidbrink (University of California, Irvine) and Michael Van Zeeland (General Atomics) have supplied new details on the process. Continued development of wave-particle physics will arm researchers with the ability to predict, and then avoid or mitigate, scenarios at ITER in which alpha particles are transported out of their confined orbits in the plasma.

Read the full article at AIP Scitation.
A pdf version of the article can also be downloaded from the General Atomics website.


return to the latest published articles