Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:

Please enter your email address:

@

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Cryostat | As clean as a freshly minted coin

    Before it is encased in its protective cocoon and moved to temporary storage, the cryostat upper cylinder must be cleaned. The operation is both low-tech and es [...]

    Read more

  • Top management | Alain Bécoulet, Head of Engineering

    When Alain Bécoulet embraced plasma physics back in the mid-1980s as a student at France's prestigious École Normale Supérieure, he did it for two reasons: one [...]

    Read more

  • Science | New steady state analysis

    Recent research shows it should be possible to reach steady-state fusion production in ITER with the baseline mix of heating and current drive systems, in parti [...]

    Read more

  • Image of the week | Like dancers in a vertical ballet

    Of all the movements of workers and equipment in the Assembly Hall, these are the most gracious... Like ballet dancers on a vertical stage, two workers are b [...]

    Read more

  • Cryostat base | Grand opening soon

    Picture a giant soup plate, 30 metres in diameter, slowing descending into a deep concrete cylinder. Track the near imperceptible movement of the double overhea [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived entries

First component installed in Tokamak Complex

Like a lunar module checking its landing coordinates one last time, the cylindrical tank with six metal feet hovered silently over the Tritium Building. The event was significant. Part of ITER's water detritiation plant system, the tank had the honour of being the first component to be installed in the Tokamak Complex.

A contribution from Europe, the 5.4-tonne, 20-cubic-metre holding tank is part of a set of four that will be installed in the coming days, along with two larger tanks. (Click to view larger version...)
A contribution from Europe, the 5.4-tonne, 20-cubic-metre holding tank is part of a set of four that will be installed in the coming days, along with two larger tanks.
Both a "captive component" (once installed, it cannot be removed) and a Protection Important Component (PIC), the holding tank that was lowered into the Tritium Building on the morning of Tuesday 29 March is part of a set of four that will play a key part in the detritiation process of the ITER installation.

In the Tokamak Building, tritium needs to be removed from the atmosphere of different "spaces" such as the vacuum vessel, the port cells, the neutral beam injector, etc.

Both a ''captive component'' and a Protection Important Component (PIC), the holding tank will play a key part in the detritiation process of the Tokamak Complex. (Click to view larger version...)
Both a ''captive component'' and a Protection Important Component (PIC), the holding tank will play a key part in the detritiation process of the Tokamak Complex.
Tritiated air is extracted and passed through a shower (the "scrubber columns") to become tritiated water, which is stored in holding tanks. Following storage, the tritiated water is submitted to electrolysis to recuperate the highly valuable tritium in the ITER fuel cycle.

Three years ago the design of the tanks was launched and progressed in parallel with the design of the finer details of the Tritium Building—such as defining the precise position of the anchors for the tanks.

As interfaces perfectly locked into place, Tuesday's operation marked an important and symbolic moment in the progress of construction.


return to the latest published articles