Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:


Please enter your email address:

@

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Crane operator | A cabin in the sky

    There are times, at dusk, when the ITER construction platform resembles an airport, with roads and buildings illuminated by yellow and white lights. From their [...]

    Read more

  • Assembly | A colossal task made manageable

    For the execution of work during the next project phase—machine and plant assembly up to First Plasma—the ITER Organization has chosen a contractual approach th [...]

    Read more

  • Neutral Beam Test Facility | A new agreement for a new era

    The ITER Organization and the Italian consortium Consorzio RFX* have signed a new agreement governing the construction and operation of the ITER Neutral Beam Te [...]

    Read more

  • Load tests | Heavyweight champion

    The Assembly Hall, with its two giant tools towering 20 metres above ground, is one of the most spectacular locations on the ITER site. When a dummy load weighi [...]

    Read more

  • Fusion's new pioneers | How to go fast enough to make a difference

    Last month in New York, the Stellar Energy Foundation and the Fusion Industry Association co-hosted an invitation-only workshop: 'Roadmap to the Fusion Energy E [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived entries

First component installed in Tokamak Complex

Like a lunar module checking its landing coordinates one last time, the cylindrical tank with six metal feet hovered silently over the Tritium Building. The event was significant. Part of ITER's water detritiation plant system, the tank had the honour of being the first component to be installed in the Tokamak Complex.

A contribution from Europe, the 5.4-tonne, 20-cubic-metre holding tank is part of a set of four that will be installed in the coming days, along with two larger tanks. (Click to view larger version...)
A contribution from Europe, the 5.4-tonne, 20-cubic-metre holding tank is part of a set of four that will be installed in the coming days, along with two larger tanks.
Both a "captive component" (once installed, it cannot be removed) and a Protection Important Component (PIC), the holding tank that was lowered into the Tritium Building on the morning of Tuesday 29 March is part of a set of four that will play a key part in the detritiation process of the ITER installation.

In the Tokamak Building, tritium needs to be removed from the atmosphere of different "spaces" such as the vacuum vessel, the port cells, the neutral beam injector, etc.

Both a ''captive component'' and a Protection Important Component (PIC), the holding tank will play a key part in the detritiation process of the Tokamak Complex. (Click to view larger version...)
Both a ''captive component'' and a Protection Important Component (PIC), the holding tank will play a key part in the detritiation process of the Tokamak Complex.
Tritiated air is extracted and passed through a shower (the "scrubber columns") to become tritiated water, which is stored in holding tanks. Following storage, the tritiated water is submitted to electrolysis to recuperate the highly valuable tritium in the ITER fuel cycle.

Three years ago the design of the tanks was launched and progressed in parallel with the design of the finer details of the Tritium Building—such as defining the precise position of the anchors for the tanks.

As interfaces perfectly locked into place, Tuesday's operation marked an important and symbolic moment in the progress of construction.


return to the latest published articles