Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:


Please enter your email address:

@

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Question of the week | Will fusion run out of fuel?

    One of the paradoxes of fusion, the virtually inexhaustible energy of the future, is that it relies on an element that does not exist—or just barely. Tritium, o [...]

    Read more

  • Managing data | Setting up a robust process

    Are the ITER systems and processes robust enough to manage the technical and project data for a program of ITER's complexity? Will quality information be made a [...]

    Read more

  • Image of the week | Bullseye

    Two perfectly circular structures, looking a lot like archery targets, have been installed on the west-facing wall of the Tokamak Complex. They are not for sh [...]

    Read more

  • Art and science | Seeking new perspectives on fusion

    Standing in the middle of the Tokamak Building, sound artist Julian Weaver positions his 3D microphone near one of the openings of the bioshield to record the s [...]

    Read more

  • Worksite photos | The view one never tires of

    For the past three-and a half years, ITER Communication has been documenting construction progress from the top of the tallest crane on the ITER worksite. Altho [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived entries

Winding completed on first central solenoid module

US ITER

The final turns of the first central solenoid module on the winding table at General Atomics. Photo: GA (Click to view larger version...)
The final turns of the first central solenoid module on the winding table at General Atomics. Photo: GA
The US Domestic Agency and vendor General Atomics completed a major milestone on 6 April by winding the first module for the ITER central solenoid. The feat was accomplished at the General Atomics Magnet Development Facility in Poway, California.

Each central solenoid module is fabricated from approximately 6,000 metres of niobium-tin (Nb3Sn) conductor, supplied by Japan in seven spools. The central solenoid, a giant electromagnet considered the "heartbeat of ITER," will consist of six stacked modules surrounded by a support structure.  When assembled, the entire 13 Tesla central solenoid and associated structures will be 13 metres tall and weigh 1,000 metric tons.

Conductor from six spools is wound to form six separate hexapancakes (6 layers) containing 14 turns. The seventh spool is wound to form a quadpancake (4 layers) containing 14 turns.

After winding, the completed hexapancakes and quadpancake will be stacked and joined prior to heat treatment, insulation, vacuum pressure impregnation, and final testing.


return to the latest published articles