Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:


Please enter your email address:

@

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Cryoplant | A vertical displacement event

    Three vertical storage tanks have been installed since last week outside of the cryoplant. The operation requires two powerful cranes working in tandem but also [...]

    Read more

  • Science in Texas | ITER draws enthousiasm

    At its Annual Meeting in Austin, Texas, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, AAAS, invited participants to illustrate how investment in basi [...]

    Read more

  • Image of the week | In the belly of the (flying) whale

    On 15 February, 'Isabelle' and 'Jeanne,' the last of the ten toroidal field coils manufactured in France for the EU-Japan tokamak JT-60SA, were swallowed into t [...]

    Read more

  • Nuclear safety | "A pragmatic and creative approach"

    Safety is at the core of all nuclear activities. Over the past seven decades—since the first experimental reactor was brought to criticality in 1942—codes, stan [...]

    Read more

  • Intellectual property | Modernizing processes and practices

    'A wise man will always allow a fool to rob him of ideas without yelling 'Thief.' If he is wise, he has not been impoverished,' says Ben Hecht in A Child of the [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived articles

Winding completed on first central solenoid module

US ITER

The final turns of the first central solenoid module on the winding table at General Atomics. Photo: GA (Click to view larger version...)
The final turns of the first central solenoid module on the winding table at General Atomics. Photo: GA
The US Domestic Agency and vendor General Atomics completed a major milestone on 6 April by winding the first module for the ITER central solenoid. The feat was accomplished at the General Atomics Magnet Development Facility in Poway, California.

Each central solenoid module is fabricated from approximately 6,000 metres of niobium-tin (Nb3Sn) conductor, supplied by Japan in seven spools. The central solenoid, a giant electromagnet considered the "heartbeat of ITER," will consist of six stacked modules surrounded by a support structure.  When assembled, the entire 13 Tesla central solenoid and associated structures will be 13 metres tall and weigh 1,000 metric tons.

Conductor from six spools is wound to form six separate hexapancakes (6 layers) containing 14 turns. The seventh spool is wound to form a quadpancake (4 layers) containing 14 turns.

After winding, the completed hexapancakes and quadpancake will be stacked and joined prior to heat treatment, insulation, vacuum pressure impregnation, and final testing.


return to the latest published articles