Heat waves

Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:

Please enter your email address:

@

Your email address will only be used for the purpose of sending you the ITER Organization publication(s) that you have requested. ITER Organization will not transfer your email address or other personal data to any other party or use it for commercial purposes.

If you change your mind, you can easily unsubscribe by clicking the unsubscribe option at the bottom of an email you've received from ITER Organization.

For more information, see our Privacy policy.

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • In-vessel coils | First components arrive on site

    ITER has received the first shipments of mineral-insulated conductor for ITER's in-vessel coils. The first lengths are destined for winding and bending trials a [...]

    Read more

  • Controlling divertor power fluxes in 3D | ITER Scientist Fellows make progress

    New research results open a path to an integrated solution for optimizing the control of stationary and transient power fluxes on ITER.   Tokamak plasmas [...]

    Read more

  • Cooperation | Canada returns to the table

    Canada, one of the early participants in ITER, is back in the project. On Thursday 15 October, Bernard Bigot, on behalf of the ITER Organization, and Assistant [...]

    Read more

  • Heat rejection basins | A massive fill-up

    When the ITER Tokamak begins producing burning plasmas and auxiliary systems are operating at full capacity, the amount of heat to be removed from the installat [...]

    Read more

  • Fusion world | Teaching teachers about fusion

    The possibility to visit three fusion facilities, all in one afternoon. Welcome to the new virtual world! More than 300 science teachers recently seized the opp [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived entries

Heat waves

A building that is 45 metres long, 49 metres wide and 26 metres high—that is what it will take to host the powerful radiofrequency sources that will contribute their power to heating the ITER plasma.

 (Click to view larger version...)
Located adjacent to the Assembly Hall, the Radiofrequency Heating Building will be home to the 24 ITER gyrotrons that will each generate microwave beams over a thousand times more powerful than a home microwave oven. The building will also host the generators that produce high-power radio frequency waves for the two 45-tonne antennas of the ion cyclotron resonance heating system.


 (Click to view larger version...)
Steel reinforcement work and concrete pouring are underway now on the building's foundation slab. Both systems will be connected to the ITER Tokamak by way of transmission lines and will deliver a total of 40 MW of heating power to the plasma.

Equipment installation is scheduled in late October 2017 and building handover, once all equipment is installed, in August 2018.


return to the latest published articles