Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:


Please enter your email address:

@

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Neutral beam injection | How ELISE is contributing to ITER

    ITER's neutral beam injection system is based on a radio frequency source that has been the subject of decades of development in Europe. At Max Planck Institute [...]

    Read more

  • Image of the week | Almost there

    The Tokamak Building has reached its maximum height ... in terms of concrete that is. The 'jewel box' in reinforced concrete will grow no more; instead, it will [...]

    Read more

  • Powerful lasers | A mockup to demonstrate safety

    During ITER operation, high-powered lasers will gather important diagnostic information on the properties and behaviour of the plasma, such as density, temperat [...]

    Read more

  • Cryostat | Lower cylinder revealed

    They were all there: those who designed it, those who forged it, those who assembled and welded it, and those who closely monitored the requirements and procedu [...]

    Read more

  • Europe's DEMO | What it could be like

    It looks like ITER, feels like ITER, but it's not ITER. In this depiction of what the site layout for the next-step fusion machine, DEMO, might look like in Eur [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived entries

Crane versus barge: a tale of Russian ingenuity

L.C.

Re-christened ИТЭР 2016, or ITER 2016, a humble barge has become part of the engineering sophistication that is the ITER Project. (Click to view larger version...)
Re-christened ИТЭР 2016, or ITER 2016, a humble barge has become part of the engineering sophistication that is the ITER Project.
The Srednenevsky facility layout is favourable to manufacturing ultra-large components for later shipment. Situated on the Neva River near St Petersburg, the shipyard enjoys direct access to the Baltic Sea and global shipping routes.

Still, when manufacturing a component as large as ITER's poloidal field coil #1 (PF1)—200-tonnes when completed—there remains a not-insignificant engineering challenge: how to transfer this massive component from the construction hall to the transport ship. An obvious solution—but highly expensive—would be to construct a giant crane for this purpose.

The Srednenevsky team came up with a more creative strategy. Most of the multi-stage assembly platform for the PF1 coil fabrication process has been erected atop a stationary barge. This includes the vacuum pressure impregnation of each of the "double pancake" sections with epoxy resin, as well as the assembly of the double pancakes into the finished coil.

When the PF1 coil is complete, it will be lowered to a 45-degree angle for stability. The barge will then be tugged backward out of the construction hall and into the Neva River. There the coil and its platform will be transferred to a ship to begin their long journey "homeward."

Thus a humble barge—aptly re-christened ИТЭР 2016, or ITER 2016—has become part of the engineering sophistication that is the ITER Project.


return to the latest published articles