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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Gravity supports | First production unit in China

    Bolted in a perfect circle to the pedestal ring of the cryostat base, 18 gravity supports will brace the curved outer edge of each toroidal field coil. These un [...]

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  • Conference | Fun-filled vacuum

    The science of ITER is not simple. But with a bit of imagination (and a dose of humour) a way can be found to convey the most complex physics notions to a publi [...]

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  • Naive question of the week | What happens to the car keys?

    We begin today a new series that aims to answer basic, even naive, questions about fusion and ITER. An image used often, when trying to convey the amount of e [...]

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  • Metrology | Facing the millimetre test

    In the realm of the very large at ITER, some of the biggest challenges are lurking down in the millimetre range. Within the Assembly Building a massive struct [...]

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  • Fusion research in Europe | Working it out together

    In Europe, fusion research is structured around a goal-oriented roadmap that closely involves universities, research laboratories and industry. Sibylle Günter, [...]

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Of Interest

See archived articles

A spectacular rendition of the Tokamak Complex

One million components, as many as ten million individual parts, fifteen major systems ... it all adds up to the most complex scientific installation ever designed. (Click to view larger version...)
One million components, as many as ten million individual parts, fifteen major systems ... it all adds up to the most complex scientific installation ever designed.
It takes more than just a tokamak to achieve fusion energy—it takes a tokamak and a huge system of pipes, pumps, tanks, cables and feeders of all sorts.

In this striking cutaway, created by CAD Technician Lauris Honoré, the complexity and the size of the Tokamak Building, the Tokamak and ancillary systems (note the figures in their orange jump suits) is made evident. One million components, as many as ten million individual parts, fifteen major systems ... it all adds up to the most complex installation ever designed.

What will happen at its core—in the plasma that glows pink in this representation—has the potential to change the course of history. By fusing hydrogen nuclei, ITER will open the way to a new era of unlimited, clean and safe energy.

This spectacular rendition of the Tokamak Complex will soon be available in high resolution in the Publication Centre on our website.

Just in case you feel like changing the poster of palm trees swinging in a tropical breeze ...


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