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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Deliveries | A third magnet ready for transport to ITER

    Three ITER magnets are now in transit to ITER from different points on the globe—two toroidal field magnets and one poloidal field coil. In terms of component w [...]

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  • Heaviest load yet | Europe's coil soon to hit the road

    It's big, it's heavy, it's precious and it's highly symbolic: the toroidal field coil that was unloaded at Marseille industrial harbour on 17 March is the most [...]

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  • Russia's ring coil | Entering the final sequence

    The smallest of ITER's poloidal field coils is entering the final sequence in a long series of activities that transform cable-in-conduit superconductor into a [...]

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  • Coping with COVID | Adjusting to maintain progress

    COVID-19 needs no introduction. But for a 35-country collaboration like ITER, the dramatic worldwide spread of the virus has introduced an entirely new set of c [...]

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  • United States | A roadmap to fusion energy

    Hundreds of scientists across the United States—representing a broad range of national labs, universities, and private ventures—have collaborated to produce A C [...]

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Of Interest

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A spectacular rendition of the Tokamak Complex

One million components, as many as ten million individual parts, fifteen major systems ... it all adds up to the most complex scientific installation ever designed. (Click to view larger version...)
One million components, as many as ten million individual parts, fifteen major systems ... it all adds up to the most complex scientific installation ever designed.
It takes more than just a tokamak to achieve fusion energy—it takes a tokamak and a huge system of pipes, pumps, tanks, cables and feeders of all sorts.

In this striking cutaway, created by CAD Technician Lauris Honoré, the complexity and the size of the Tokamak Building, the Tokamak and ancillary systems (note the figures in their orange jump suits) is made evident. One million components, as many as ten million individual parts, fifteen major systems ... it all adds up to the most complex installation ever designed.

What will happen at its core—in the plasma that glows pink in this representation—has the potential to change the course of history. By fusing hydrogen nuclei, ITER will open the way to a new era of unlimited, clean and safe energy.

This spectacular rendition of the Tokamak Complex will soon be available in high resolution in the Publication Centre on our website.

Just in case you feel like changing the poster of palm trees swinging in a tropical breeze ...


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