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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Open Doors Day | An intense and unforgettable experience

    Saturday was Jacques's birthday. At age 90, the long-retired engineer from Aix-en-Provence had only one item on his wish list: to visit ITER for a third time an [...]

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  • Power conversion | A potent illustration of the "One ITER" spirit

    Europe made the buildings; the piping came from India; China and Korea provided the transformers; Russia manufactured the massive 'busbar' network. The ITER Org [...]

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  • Fusion world | Upgrade completed on DIII-D tokamak

    The DIII-D National Fusion Program (US) has completed a series of important enhancements to its fusion facility, providing researchers with several first-of-a-k [...]

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  • Vacuum lab | Ensuring leak test sensitivity

    A helium leak test is one of several factory acceptance tests planned for the sectors of the ITER vacuum vessel before they are shipped to ITER. In a vacuum lab [...]

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  • Bookmark | The Future of Fusion Energy

    To write about fusion is to walk a fine line between the temptation of lyricism and the arid demands of scientific accuracy. Whereas the general media tends to [...]

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Of Interest

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A spectacular rendition of the Tokamak Complex

One million components, as many as ten million individual parts, fifteen major systems ... it all adds up to the most complex scientific installation ever designed. (Click to view larger version...)
One million components, as many as ten million individual parts, fifteen major systems ... it all adds up to the most complex scientific installation ever designed.
It takes more than just a tokamak to achieve fusion energy—it takes a tokamak and a huge system of pipes, pumps, tanks, cables and feeders of all sorts.

In this striking cutaway, created by CAD Technician Lauris Honoré, the complexity and the size of the Tokamak Building, the Tokamak and ancillary systems (note the figures in their orange jump suits) is made evident. One million components, as many as ten million individual parts, fifteen major systems ... it all adds up to the most complex installation ever designed.

What will happen at its core—in the plasma that glows pink in this representation—has the potential to change the course of history. By fusing hydrogen nuclei, ITER will open the way to a new era of unlimited, clean and safe energy.

This spectacular rendition of the Tokamak Complex will soon be available in high resolution in the Publication Centre on our website.

Just in case you feel like changing the poster of palm trees swinging in a tropical breeze ...


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