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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • 23rd ITER Council | Pace and performance on track

    Working as an integrated team, the ITER Organization and seven Domestic Agencies are continuing to meet the project's demanding schedule to First Plasma in 2025 [...]

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  • Huffing and puffing | Testing the endurance of steering mirrors

    On the computer screen, a set of three metal bellows 'breathe' in a steady rhythm. Nuclear engineer Natalia Casal and materials engineer Toshimichi Omori are on [...]

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  • ITER R&D | News from the Neutral Beam Test Facility

    At Consorzio RFX, where ITER's most powerful external heating system will be tested in advance, activities are progressing well on two distinct test beds. ITE [...]

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  • Vacuum vessel welding | Rehearsing a grand production

    There is a place near Santander, Spain, where one can actually feel what ITER will be like. Although we've seen dozens of drawings and 3D animations, the encoun [...]

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  • Image of the week | A plasma-enlightened training course

    The Vacuum Section hosted approximately 40 people last week from the ITER Organization and the Domestic Agencies for a two-day training session on vacuum. [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

A spectacular rendition of the Tokamak Complex

One million components, as many as ten million individual parts, fifteen major systems ... it all adds up to the most complex scientific installation ever designed. (Click to view larger version...)
One million components, as many as ten million individual parts, fifteen major systems ... it all adds up to the most complex scientific installation ever designed.
It takes more than just a tokamak to achieve fusion energy—it takes a tokamak and a huge system of pipes, pumps, tanks, cables and feeders of all sorts.

In this striking cutaway, created by CAD Technician Lauris Honoré, the complexity and the size of the Tokamak Building, the Tokamak and ancillary systems (note the figures in their orange jump suits) is made evident. One million components, as many as ten million individual parts, fifteen major systems ... it all adds up to the most complex installation ever designed.

What will happen at its core—in the plasma that glows pink in this representation—has the potential to change the course of history. By fusing hydrogen nuclei, ITER will open the way to a new era of unlimited, clean and safe energy.

This spectacular rendition of the Tokamak Complex will soon be available in high resolution in the Publication Centre on our website.

Just in case you feel like changing the poster of palm trees swinging in a tropical breeze ...


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