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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • The magnet lab next door

    Two and a half years ago ITER and the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) entered a collaborationto prepare for the challenging task [...]

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  • Activity on every floor

    At every floor of the Tokamak Complex—from the lowest underground level (B2) all the way to the second regular level of the bioshield (L2)—there is intense acti [...]

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  • Bringing the Research Plan up to date

    The ITER Research Plan is an ITER baseline document which outlines the main lines of science and technology research derived from the project's mission goals. [...]

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  • Further validation for ring magnet fabrication

    Once a component mockup has been produced—and before fabrication can begin on the actual component or system—a manufacturing readiness review is required to ens [...]

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  • First central solenoid module ready for heat treatment

    In a major milestone, the US contractor responsible for the fabrication of the ITER central solenoid has successfully joined seven individual coil sections, or [...]

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Of Interest

See archived articles

As big (and heavy) as a whale



It was pouring when the two 35-metre-long quench tanks were delivered to the ITER site at 2:12 a.m. on Thursday 24 November. And it was still raining heavily on the following afternoon when the huge components were lifted from their trailers and placed in storage on "elephant legs."

But rain or shine, components must be delivered. Despite the adverse climatic conditions—with strong winds and a storm brewing—the two-tank convoy travelled the last leg of its journey without incident.

Manufactured by the Czech subcontractor (Chart Ferox) of Air Liquide, under contract with the European Domestic Agency for the procurement of the ITER liquid nitrogen plant and auxiliary systems, the quench tanks are an essential part of the ITER cryoplant.  In case of a "quench"—the sudden loss of coil superconductivity—they will collect and store the helium that is expelled from the tokamak's magnetic system.

More information on the European Domestic Agency Energy website.


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