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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • The crown's jewels

    They are the jewels of the concrete crown that will support the combined mass of the Tokamak and its surrounding cryostat: 18 perfectly polished, chrome-plated [...]

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  • "Making the best of fusion installations in Europe"

    With the recent addition of the Ukraine's Kharkov Institute for Physics and Technology (KIPT), the EUROfusion consortium now encompasses 30 European fusion labo [...]

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  • New cryostat manufacturing milestone

    They all gathered—members of the ITER-India team and contractor Larsen & Toubro—to mark a portentous moment: the start of manufacturing on the upper cylinde [...]

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  • Key power supply elements pass tests in Russia

    Since the signature of a Procurement Arrangement in 2011 with Russia for switching networks, fast discharge units, DC busbars and instrumentation—all key elemen [...]

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  • First vessel subassembly achieved in Europe

    Nine massive steel sectors deliveredby the Domestic Agencies of Europe (five sectors) and Korea (four sectors) will be welded together on site during the assemb [...]

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Of Interest

See archived articles

As big (and heavy) as a whale



It was pouring when the two 35-metre-long quench tanks were delivered to the ITER site at 2:12 a.m. on Thursday 24 November. And it was still raining heavily on the following afternoon when the huge components were lifted from their trailers and placed in storage on "elephant legs."

But rain or shine, components must be delivered. Despite the adverse climatic conditions—with strong winds and a storm brewing—the two-tank convoy travelled the last leg of its journey without incident.

Manufactured by the Czech subcontractor (Chart Ferox) of Air Liquide, under contract with the European Domestic Agency for the procurement of the ITER liquid nitrogen plant and auxiliary systems, the quench tanks are an essential part of the ITER cryoplant.  In case of a "quench"—the sudden loss of coil superconductivity—they will collect and store the helium that is expelled from the tokamak's magnetic system.

More information on the European Domestic Agency Energy website.


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