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  • Vacuum vessel | First segment completed in Korea

    The technically challenging fabrication of the ITER vacuum vessel is progressing in Korea, where Hyundai Heavy Industries has completed the first poloidal segme [...]

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  • Project progress | How do we know where we stand?

    If ITER were an ordinary project, like the building of a bridge, the construction of a highway or even the launching of a satellite into space, it would be rela [...]

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  • Radial walls| Thickest rebar and most intricate geometry

    The combined mass of the ITER Tokamak and its enveloping cryostat is equivalent to that of three Eiffel Towers. But not only is it heavy (23,000 tonnes) ... it [...]

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  • Next step | Japan revises its DEMO strategy

    In light of recent progress on the construction of ITER and developments in domestic fusion research, the Science and Technology Committee on Fusion Energy—part [...]

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  • Monaco-ITER Fellows | Campaign opens for the 6th generation

    The ink has only just dried on the second Monaco-ITER Partnership Arrangement. Funded by the Principality of Monaco, the Arrangement allows the ITER Organizatio [...]

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Of Interest

See archived articles

Many will be heavier, none will be wider

Of all the components that will be delivered to ITER in the years to come, many will be heavier, taller and more spectacular than the two "E-Houses" that reached the worksite shortly after 1:00 a.m. on Thursday 9 February.

The ''E-house'' that was installed on its final location upon arrival was the smallest of the two. Still, at 8.3 metres wide, it was no small achievement to get it through the densely packed ITER worksite © DAHER (Click to view larger version...)
The ''E-house'' that was installed on its final location upon arrival was the smallest of the two. Still, at 8.3 metres wide, it was no small achievement to get it through the densely packed ITER worksite © DAHER
But none will be wider: at 8.7 metres wide, the larger of the two E-houses was just 30 centimetres below the limit that the ITER Itinerary can accept...

The two "houses" had travelled together from China. Upon arrival at ITER, the larger E-house (27 metres long, 8.7 metres wide, 130 tonnes) was put in storage at the entrance of the ITER site until its concrete base could be realized; its near twin (24 metres long, 8.3 metres wide, 110 tonnes) was installed in its final location between the electrical switchyard and the large transformers.

The installed E-house will be progressively equipped with the complex set of cables that will connect it through the switchyard to the French national grid.


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