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Latest ITER Newsline

  • Component delivery| A jewel in a box

    Sailing under the flag of Germany, the Regine is a mighty ship, strengthened for heavy cargo and equipped on its portside with two 750-tonne on-board cranes. Ha [...]

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  • Education | Make your own tokamak with 3D printing!

    It's not Lego, but it is definitely 'hands-on.' To offer a tangible device to illustrate the workings of magnetic confinement fusion in a tokamak, the ITER Orga [...]

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  • Worksite | Europe's Fusion for Energy is building the ITER installation

    Anyone driving to ITER can take full measure of the enormity of the project a few kilometers before reaching the destination. Gigantic cranes can be seen from a [...]

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  • Disruption mitigation | Experts in plasma disruptions gather online

    On 20-23 July, 120 international experts participated in the 1st IAEA Technical Meeting on Plasma Disruptions and their Mitigation, jointly organized by the Int [...]

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  • Start of assembly | World dignitaries celebrate a collaborative achievement

    Due to the constraints imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic, the crowd in the ITER Assembly Hall was small. But thanks to live broadcasting and video feed, the audi [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

Many will be heavier, none will be wider

Of all the components that will be delivered to ITER in the years to come, many will be heavier, taller and more spectacular than the two "E-Houses" that reached the worksite shortly after 1:00 a.m. on Thursday 9 February.

The ''E-house'' that was installed on its final location upon arrival was the smallest of the two. Still, at 8.3 metres wide, it was no small achievement to get it through the densely packed ITER worksite © DAHER (Click to view larger version...)
The ''E-house'' that was installed on its final location upon arrival was the smallest of the two. Still, at 8.3 metres wide, it was no small achievement to get it through the densely packed ITER worksite © DAHER
But none will be wider: at 8.7 metres wide, the larger of the two E-houses was just 30 centimetres below the limit that the ITER Itinerary can accept...

The two "houses" had travelled together from China. Upon arrival at ITER, the larger E-house (27 metres long, 8.7 metres wide, 130 tonnes) was put in storage at the entrance of the ITER site until its concrete base could be realized; its near twin (24 metres long, 8.3 metres wide, 110 tonnes) was installed in its final location between the electrical switchyard and the large transformers.

The installed E-house will be progressively equipped with the complex set of cables that will connect it through the switchyard to the French national grid.


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