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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • ITER Council: project metrics confirm performance

    The governing body of the ITER Organization, the ITER Council, met for the twenty-first time on 15 and 16 November 2017 under the chairmanship of Won Namkung (K [...]

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  • COP 23 | Placing ITER on the global scene

    On the western bank of theRhine and not far from the seat of the UN Climate Change Secretariat, world leaders are discussing how to push ahead for international [...]

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  • Japan's MEXT Minister | Seeing is believing

    On 4 November, ITER received Yoshimasa Hayashi, the Japanese Minister of MEXT—the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology with oversight [...]

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  • Architect Engineer | ENGAGE receives prestigious award

    Since 2006, the French 'Grand Prix de l'Ingénierie' has recognized engineering projects and/or teams that are remarkable in terms of scope, innovation, complexi [...]

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  • Sub-assembly tools | One foot inside

    The twin Korean giants already have a foot inside the Assembly Hall—literally. The foot—or 'bottom inboard column' in ITER parlance—is a 4.4-metre-long steel [...]

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Of Interest

See archived articles

A narrow passage to ITER

At the gorge of Mirabeau, 10 kilometres to the south of the ITER site, the wide Durance riverbed abruptly narrows into a gully less than 180 metres wide.

The remnants of the old bridge of Mirabeau, built in 1847, seem to stand guard over the narrow passage that leads to ITER. (Click to view larger version...)
The remnants of the old bridge of Mirabeau, built in 1847, seem to stand guard over the narrow passage that leads to ITER.
Overlooking the left bank, a road leading to the village of Saint-Paul-lez-Durance was hewn from the rock. Despite recent adjustments, it still offers only limited space for passage.

And yet, this is the road every ITER convoy must travel in order to reach the ITER site.

In this picture, a segment of the ITER cryostat lower cylinder is embarking on the last leg of its journey—ITER is now only 30 minutes away.

To the left, the remnants of the old bridge, built in 1847, seem to stand guard over the passage.

Initially planned as an HEL convoy (for Highly Exceptional Load)—a massive and costly logistics operation—the six lower cylinder segments of the cryostat were all "downgraded" to CEL convoys (for Conventional Exceptional Load), a transport category that requires lighter technical assistance and a reduced security escort.

This was possible (with heavy technical adaptations) because the rather light components (39 tonnes) exceeded the typical CEL dimensions by only 65 centimetres in height.

We will soon have a story on how DAHER, the logistics service provider responsible for the transport of components from Fos-sur-Mer harbour to the ITER site, plans to bring down the anticipated number of HEL, in order to achieve "best value for money" while reducing the inconveniences of the ITER HEL convoys on local populations.


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