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Latest ITER Newsline

  • Gravity supports | First production unit in China

    Bolted in a perfect circle to the pedestal ring of the cryostat base, 18 gravity supports will brace the curved outer edge of each toroidal field coil. These un [...]

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  • Conference | Fun-filled vacuum

    The science of ITER is not simple. But with a bit of imagination (and a dose of humour) a way can be found to convey the most complex physics notions to a publi [...]

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  • Naive question of the week | What happens to the car keys?

    We begin today a new series that aims to answer basic, even naive, questions about fusion and ITER. An image used often, when trying to convey the amount of e [...]

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  • Metrology | Facing the millimetre test

    In the realm of the very large at ITER, some of the biggest challenges are lurking down in the millimetre range. Within the Assembly Building a massive struct [...]

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  • Fusion research in Europe | Working it out together

    In Europe, fusion research is structured around a goal-oriented roadmap that closely involves universities, research laboratories and industry. Sibylle Günter, [...]

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Of Interest

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First procurement for ITER cryosystem signed

The ITER cryolines supplying the torus and the cryostat. The line concerned by today's Procurement Arrangement is the green line in the basement. (Click to view larger version...)
The ITER cryolines supplying the torus and the cryostat. The line concerned by today's Procurement Arrangement is the green line in the basement.
A signature, a photo, and then the contract went straight to the post office. (Click to view larger version...)
A signature, a photo, and then the contract went straight to the post office.
On Friday 4 June, the first Procurement Arrangement for the ITER cryo-system was signed. The contract worth approximately EUR 5.4 million will be procured by the Indian Domestic Agency and covers the cryolines that will provide cooling power for all the ITER components that have to operate at cryogenic temperatures. At minus 269 degrees Celsius, that's pretty cool.

The ITER cryosystem will be the second largest in the world after the cooling system for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. The key challenges for the ITER system lie with its complex geometry and its capability to function in pulsed operation. The component will be built into the cryoplant and will be required in June 2013. That is why the contract, signed by ITER Director-General Kaname Ikeda, was rushed by priority mail to India.


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