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Latest ITER Newsline

  • Cryostat base | Grand opening soon

    Picture a giant soup plate, 30 metres in diameter, slowing descending into a deep concrete cylinder. Track the near imperceptible movement of the double overhea [...]

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  • Research | ITER Scientist Fellows are at the cutting edge

    In the area of cutting-edge research—and particularly the sophisticated modelling of plasmas—the project is benefitting from the assistance of world-renowned ex [...]

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  • Image of the week | Testing the load path

    Teams are preparing now for the commissioning and dynamic load tests that will be carried out in the coming weeks on the assembly bridge cranes. The load tests, [...]

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  • In memoriam | Physicist John Wesson

    The theoretical physicist, author of a major reference book on magnetic confinement fusion in tokamaks, was known to many members of the ITER community. Some [...]

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  • CODAC | The "invisible system" that makes all things possible

    It is easy to spot all the big equipment going into ITER; what is not so visible is the underlying software that makes the equipment come alive. Local control [...]

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Of Interest

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First procurement for ITER cryosystem signed

The ITER cryolines supplying the torus and the cryostat. The line concerned by today's Procurement Arrangement is the green line in the basement. (Click to view larger version...)
The ITER cryolines supplying the torus and the cryostat. The line concerned by today's Procurement Arrangement is the green line in the basement.
A signature, a photo, and then the contract went straight to the post office. (Click to view larger version...)
A signature, a photo, and then the contract went straight to the post office.
On Friday 4 June, the first Procurement Arrangement for the ITER cryo-system was signed. The contract worth approximately EUR 5.4 million will be procured by the Indian Domestic Agency and covers the cryolines that will provide cooling power for all the ITER components that have to operate at cryogenic temperatures. At minus 269 degrees Celsius, that's pretty cool.

The ITER cryosystem will be the second largest in the world after the cooling system for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. The key challenges for the ITER system lie with its complex geometry and its capability to function in pulsed operation. The component will be built into the cryoplant and will be required in June 2013. That is why the contract, signed by ITER Director-General Kaname Ikeda, was rushed by priority mail to India.


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