Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:


Please enter your email address:

@

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • ITER Council: project metrics confirm performance

    The governing body of the ITER Organization, the ITER Council, met for the twenty-first time on 15 and 16 November 2017 under the chairmanship of Won Namkung (K [...]

    Read more

  • COP 23 | Placing ITER on the global scene

    On the western bank of theRhine and not far from the seat of the UN Climate Change Secretariat, world leaders are discussing how to push ahead for international [...]

    Read more

  • Japan's MEXT Minister | Seeing is believing

    On 4 November, ITER received Yoshimasa Hayashi, the Japanese Minister of MEXT—the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology with oversight [...]

    Read more

  • Architect Engineer | ENGAGE receives prestigious award

    Since 2006, the French 'Grand Prix de l'Ingénierie' has recognized engineering projects and/or teams that are remarkable in terms of scope, innovation, complexi [...]

    Read more

  • Sub-assembly tools | One foot inside

    The twin Korean giants already have a foot inside the Assembly Hall—literally. The foot—or 'bottom inboard column' in ITER parlance—is a 4.4-metre-long steel [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived articles

In search of the green plasma

R.A.

Sébastien König's core competence is in planning and scheduling; his passion is in understanding the workings of the Universe. In his previous life, before joining ITER in 2013, he worked for large projects all over the world—aluminium smelters, hydroelectric power dam construction, iron ore mining, and a host of other ventures that require painstaking computing and the integration of thousands of different parameters.

Sébastien and his family in Iceland, under the thin, luminescent drapes of Iceland's Northern Lights—''an incredibly moving experience...'' (Click to view larger version...)
Sébastien and his family in Iceland, under the thin, luminescent drapes of Iceland's Northern Lights—''an incredibly moving experience...''
All the while he kept observing the sky, tracking the passage of the International Space Station from his backyard, vacationing in Namibia with his wife and children to visit the HESS gamma ray observatory, or joining a group of amateur astronomers for a tour of the major US and European observatories in the Chilean Andes.

His latest family expedition, in February, took him to Iceland in search of the green plasmas of aurora borealis. The experience was a perfect demonstration of how careful planning and thorough contingency management can lead to the one of most intense of celestial experiences.

"I planned this trip like I plan for a project," says Sébastien, "first selecting the opportunity window that matched the moonless nights during the northern lights season from October to March to the kids' school vacations; then making hotel reservations that, depending on weather conditions, I could cancel at the last minute without penalty."

Most important perhaps were the two applications that Sébastien relied on—one from the Icelandic weather service that precisely maps the position and altitude of clouds, the other from the national road service that gives real-time information on the state of roadways.

And, luck (cum preparation), of course, plays its part.

Armed with his tools and information, Sébastien was able to treat his family to unforgettable visions. "It's like a stage show, almost choreography. Thin luminescent drapes seem to slowly fall from the sky, barely moving; then you see them dance with what appears to be sudden euphoria. It's something that reaches very deep inside."

In the gallery below, you will get a sense of what the green plasma experience feels like.




return to the latest published articles