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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Worksite postcards | Under fog and autumn light

    Due to its proximity to the Durance River and to the narrow gully spanned by the Bridge of Mirabeau, the area around ITER often experiences a peculiar meteorolo [...]

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  • Assembly Hall | Another massive paint job

    By the end of December, the massive painting job in the Assembly Hall will be complete and the building's floor will be as white and pristine as the landscape i [...]

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  • ITER India | Testing a neutral beam for diagnostics

    Every 23 seconds during fusion operation, a probe beam will penetrate deep into the core of the ITER plasma to aid in the detection of helium ash—one of fusion' [...]

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  • Welded attachments | Follow the laser projections

    How do you position 150,000 welded attachments on to a vacuum vessel the size of a house, each one needing to be accurately placed to less than a 4 mm target? [...]

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  • Visit | Our neighbour the Nobel

    In 2018, the Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to Gérard Mourou for his work on ultra-short, extremely high-intensity laser pulses—the so-called 'chirped pulse [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

ITER platform

From every angle

The ITER platform is changing fast: buildings that were just steel and concrete skeletons a few weeks ago now have roofs; ongoing cladding operations herald the architectural harmony that will be the rule for all structures (with the exception of the poloidal field coil winding facility and the Cryostat Workshop, which are not covered in mirror-like stainless steel and grey-lacquered metal); and at the heart of the installation, the bioshield seems never to stop rising ...

Nestled in the hills of Provence, the ITER site is now home to more than 3,500 people, worksite workers and scientific, technical and administrative personnel. In a few years it has outgrown the village that hosts it. (Photo ITER Organization - EJF Riche) (Click to view larger version...)
Nestled in the hills of Provence, the ITER site is now home to more than 3,500 people, worksite workers and scientific, technical and administrative personnel. In a few years it has outgrown the village that hosts it. (Photo ITER Organization - EJF Riche)
This latest series of aerial photographs also reveals the growing density of construction projects and, when inspected closely, the intensity of traffic — vehicles of all kinds on the move to deliver material and equipment to the different zones and the multiple projects at various stages of completion.

The ITER site is now home to 2,000 workers; bringing the total of people on site to more than 3,500 if one includes the scientific, technical and administrative personnel inside the ITER Headquarters and temporary office structures. That is more than four times the population of the village that hosts it.


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