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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • ITER Council: project metrics confirm performance

    The governing body of the ITER Organization, the ITER Council, met for the twenty-first time on 15 and 16 November 2017 under the chairmanship of Won Namkung (K [...]

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  • COP 23 | Placing ITER on the global scene

    On the western bank of theRhine and not far from the seat of the UN Climate Change Secretariat, world leaders are discussing how to push ahead for international [...]

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  • Japan's MEXT Minister | Seeing is believing

    On 4 November, ITER received Yoshimasa Hayashi, the Japanese Minister of MEXT—the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology with oversight [...]

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  • Architect Engineer | ENGAGE receives prestigious award

    Since 2006, the French 'Grand Prix de l'Ingénierie' has recognized engineering projects and/or teams that are remarkable in terms of scope, innovation, complexi [...]

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  • Sub-assembly tools | One foot inside

    The twin Korean giants already have a foot inside the Assembly Hall—literally. The foot—or 'bottom inboard column' in ITER parlance—is a 4.4-metre-long steel [...]

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Of Interest

See archived articles

ITER platform

From every angle

The ITER platform is changing fast: buildings that were just steel and concrete skeletons a few weeks ago now have roofs; ongoing cladding operations herald the architectural harmony that will be the rule for all structures (with the exception of the poloidal field coil winding facility and the Cryostat Workshop, which are not covered in mirror-like stainless steel and grey-lacquered metal); and at the heart of the installation, the bioshield seems never to stop rising ...

Nestled in the hills of Provence, the ITER site is now home to more than 3,500 people, worksite workers and scientific, technical and administrative personnel. In a few years it has outgrown the village that hosts it. (Photo ITER Organization - EJF Riche) (Click to view larger version...)
Nestled in the hills of Provence, the ITER site is now home to more than 3,500 people, worksite workers and scientific, technical and administrative personnel. In a few years it has outgrown the village that hosts it. (Photo ITER Organization - EJF Riche)
This latest series of aerial photographs also reveals the growing density of construction projects and, when inspected closely, the intensity of traffic — vehicles of all kinds on the move to deliver material and equipment to the different zones and the multiple projects at various stages of completion.

The ITER site is now home to 2,000 workers; bringing the total of people on site to more than 3,500 if one includes the scientific, technical and administrative personnel inside the ITER Headquarters and temporary office structures. That is more than four times the population of the village that hosts it.


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