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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Heating | A pinch of moondust in the ITER plasma

    One day in the distant future, fusion plants might be fuelled by helium 3—an isotope that is extremely scarce on Earth but reputed to be abundant on the Moon. B [...]

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  • Delivery | 2,000 km through canals, locks and tunnels

    When the thruway is closed, one takes the back roads. And when it's low-water season on the Rhine-Rhône canal, a barge leaving Switzerland for the Mediterranean [...]

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  • Monaco Fellows | A hand in shaping ITER

    For the sixth time, ITER is welcoming a group of five young researchers as part of the Monaco-ITER postdoctoral fellowship scheme. Working alongside experienced [...]

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  • On site | Drone survey on a perfect day

    There are days in winter when the skies over Provence are perfectly transparent. Snowy peaks 200 kilometres away appear close enough to be touched and farms, co [...]

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  • AAAS conference | ITER on the world science stage

    With more than 120,000 members globally, the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) is billed as the world's largest scientific society. The [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

ITER platform

From every angle

The ITER platform is changing fast: buildings that were just steel and concrete skeletons a few weeks ago now have roofs; ongoing cladding operations herald the architectural harmony that will be the rule for all structures (with the exception of the poloidal field coil winding facility and the Cryostat Workshop, which are not covered in mirror-like stainless steel and grey-lacquered metal); and at the heart of the installation, the bioshield seems never to stop rising ...

Nestled in the hills of Provence, the ITER site is now home to more than 3,500 people, worksite workers and scientific, technical and administrative personnel. In a few years it has outgrown the village that hosts it. (Photo ITER Organization - EJF Riche) (Click to view larger version...)
Nestled in the hills of Provence, the ITER site is now home to more than 3,500 people, worksite workers and scientific, technical and administrative personnel. In a few years it has outgrown the village that hosts it. (Photo ITER Organization - EJF Riche)
This latest series of aerial photographs also reveals the growing density of construction projects and, when inspected closely, the intensity of traffic — vehicles of all kinds on the move to deliver material and equipment to the different zones and the multiple projects at various stages of completion.

The ITER site is now home to 2,000 workers; bringing the total of people on site to more than 3,500 if one includes the scientific, technical and administrative personnel inside the ITER Headquarters and temporary office structures. That is more than four times the population of the village that hosts it.


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