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  • Vacuum vessel assembly | Thermal shield passes first trial

    In the oversized world of ITER, the 11-metre-tall vacuum vessel thermal shield panels are lightweight components. At approximately 10 tonnes, they cannot compar [...]

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  • In memoriam | Professor Valery Aleksandrovich Kurnaev

    It is with great sadness that the ITER Organization has learned of the loss of Professor Valery Aleksandrovich Kurnaev, Director of the Moscow National Research [...]

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  • MITICA experiment | First integrated power supply tests

    In October, power supply components procured by Japan and Europe for ITER's neutral beam injector prototype were tested together for the first time. Due pandemi [...]

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  • ITER Scientific Data Centre | How to manage 2 petabytes of new data every day

    Extracting as much information as possible from operation will allow ITER to make the most efficient use of the machine. Some of the data will be immediately ne [...]

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  • Image of the week | Europe's coil #5 unloaded at Fos harbour

    Of the eighteen D-shaped toroidal field coils (plus one spare) that are needed for the ITER Tokamak, four (two from Europe and two from Japan) have already been [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

Elementary particles

And now quark fusion?

Fusion as we know it involves two nuclei of light atoms. Nature provides a dozen possible combinations for fusion, but in the present state of our technological capabilities only the fusion of deuterium (D) and tritium (T), two hydrogen isotopes, is accessible.

Researchers at Tel Aviv University and at the University of Chicago think that quark fusion could be technically feasible in a powerful particle accelerator such as CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) (Click to view larger version...)
Researchers at Tel Aviv University and at the University of Chicago think that quark fusion could be technically feasible in a powerful particle accelerator such as CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC)
Recently, physicists at Tel Aviv University in Israel and at the University of Chicago in the US have found evidence suggesting that fusion could occur between quarks, an elementary particle that is a constituent of the nucleus. Quark fusion, they calculate, could generate approximately eight times more energy than the energy released during DT fusion.

How does one go about fusing quarks? Researchers Marek Karliner and Jonathan Rosner think it could be technically feasible in a powerful particle accelerator such as CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC). But they warn that their work is still purely theoretical — just like the fusion of nuclei was not so long ago in the 1920s.

More information here and here.




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