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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Building ITER | Halfway to First Plasma

    It's been a long road and we haven't reached our destination yet. But on its way to operation, ITER has just passed a significant milestone: according to the st [...]

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  • Director-General | Visits and an award in Washington

    Keeping the governments and policy makers of the ITER Members informed on the project's progress and challenges is an essential part of the Director-General's m [...]

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  • On-site coil winding | Big, round and red

    It's big, round and red and represents the latest addition to the collection of cranes operating on the ITER construction site. On Friday 8 November, two power [...]

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  • Milestones | Japan completes central solenoid conductor

    The Japanese Domestic Agency has successfully completed the procurement of 43 kilometres (700 tonnes) of niobium-tin cable-in-conduit superconductor for ITER's [...]

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  • Neutral beam test facility | Powerful ion source delivered

    OnSPIDER, one of twotestbeds at the ITER Neutral Beam Test Facility, the negative ion source for ITER's heating neutral beam system will be demonstrated at full [...]

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Of Interest

See archived articles

Elementary particles

And now quark fusion?

Fusion as we know it involves two nuclei of light atoms. Nature provides a dozen possible combinations for fusion, but in the present state of our technological capabilities only the fusion of deuterium (D) and tritium (T), two hydrogen isotopes, is accessible.

Researchers at Tel Aviv University and at the University of Chicago think that quark fusion could be technically feasible in a powerful particle accelerator such as CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) (Click to view larger version...)
Researchers at Tel Aviv University and at the University of Chicago think that quark fusion could be technically feasible in a powerful particle accelerator such as CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC)
Recently, physicists at Tel Aviv University in Israel and at the University of Chicago in the US have found evidence suggesting that fusion could occur between quarks, an elementary particle that is a constituent of the nucleus. Quark fusion, they calculate, could generate approximately eight times more energy than the energy released during DT fusion.

How does one go about fusing quarks? Researchers Marek Karliner and Jonathan Rosner think it could be technically feasible in a powerful particle accelerator such as CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC). But they warn that their work is still purely theoretical — just like the fusion of nuclei was not so long ago in the 1920s.

More information here and here.




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