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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Rendezvous | D and T to meet at JET in 2020

    In 2020, for the first time in more than 20 years, a reaction that only occurs in the core of the stars will be produced on Earth in a man-made machine. In the [...]

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  • On site | MOMENTUM believes in recent graduates

    It is rare for students to leave university and immediately begin work on a globally significant project. But thanks to the graduate program run by the project' [...]

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  • Tokamak Pit | Big steel elbow in place

    A cryostat feedthrough delivered by the Chinese Domestic Agency has become the first metal component of the machine to be installed in the Tokamak Pit, in an op [...]

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  • Neutral beam source | Europe awards EUR 20 million contract

    The contract, awarded to ALSYOM-SEIV (ALCEN group, France), launches the manufacturing phase for the beam source that will come on line in 2022 as part of the f [...]

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  • Image of the week | US Under Secretary of Science tours site

    Five months, almost to the day, after the US Secretary of Energy Rick Perry visited ITER, his deputy, Under Secretary for Science Paul Dabbar, stood by the same [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

Elementary particles

And now quark fusion?

Fusion as we know it involves two nuclei of light atoms. Nature provides a dozen possible combinations for fusion, but in the present state of our technological capabilities only the fusion of deuterium (D) and tritium (T), two hydrogen isotopes, is accessible.

Researchers at Tel Aviv University and at the University of Chicago think that quark fusion could be technically feasible in a powerful particle accelerator such as CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) (Click to view larger version...)
Researchers at Tel Aviv University and at the University of Chicago think that quark fusion could be technically feasible in a powerful particle accelerator such as CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC)
Recently, physicists at Tel Aviv University in Israel and at the University of Chicago in the US have found evidence suggesting that fusion could occur between quarks, an elementary particle that is a constituent of the nucleus. Quark fusion, they calculate, could generate approximately eight times more energy than the energy released during DT fusion.

How does one go about fusing quarks? Researchers Marek Karliner and Jonathan Rosner think it could be technically feasible in a powerful particle accelerator such as CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC). But they warn that their work is still purely theoretical — just like the fusion of nuclei was not so long ago in the 1920s.

More information here and here.




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