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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Heating | A pinch of moondust in the ITER plasma

    One day in the distant future, fusion plants might be fuelled by helium 3—an isotope that is extremely scarce on Earth but reputed to be abundant on the Moon. B [...]

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  • Delivery | 2,000 km through canals, locks and tunnels

    When the thruway is closed, one takes the back roads. And when it's low-water season on the Rhine-Rhône canal, a barge leaving Switzerland for the Mediterranean [...]

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  • Monaco Fellows | A hand in shaping ITER

    For the sixth time, ITER is welcoming a group of five young researchers as part of the Monaco-ITER postdoctoral fellowship scheme. Working alongside experienced [...]

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  • On site | Drone survey on a perfect day

    There are days in winter when the skies over Provence are perfectly transparent. Snowy peaks 200 kilometres away appear close enough to be touched and farms, co [...]

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  • AAAS conference | ITER on the world science stage

    With more than 120,000 members globally, the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) is billed as the world's largest scientific society. The [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

Worksite progress

Spot the differences

Let's play the "spot the differences" game between these two general views of the ITER site, one taken last Thursday 18 January, the other three months ago on 11 October.

 (Click to view larger version...)
At first view nothing stands out as being dramatically different. But on closer inspection, most everything has changed.

In the Tokamak Complex to the left, the bioshield has come full circle, at least visually. Only 30 percent of the last level (L4) remains to be poured, and this work should be completed in the coming weeks.

Just outside of the bioshield, in the area of the Tokamak Building that will host neutral beam injection equipment, many new columns are in place. These strong pillars will support the next-level floor slab (L3).

 (Click to view larger version...)
Running vertically down the centre of the photograph, columns and formwork are in place for what will be the roof (L4) of the Diagnostics Building.

As for the plant buildings on the right, the changes are mostly taking place on the inside with the installation of equipment and services. In the months to come, however, we can expect to see the first large tanks going up along the cryoplant (second building from the top)—11 will be installed in all. 

More details in the photo gallery below.

Waiting for the tanks

In front of the cryoplant (second building from the top) what looks like a theatre marquee, ready to shelter chauffeured limousines, is in fact a concrete platform that will support a 190,000-litre liquid helium tank—one of the 11 tanks that will be installed, either vertically or horizontally, along the building. Early in February, the first of eleven helium and nitrogen tanks of various sizes and capacities, some vertical some horizontal, will be installed outside the building. Most of them will be anchored to the circular structures that are visible at the right end of the building. Civil works are now finalized in the twin power conversion buildings that stand parallel to the cryoplant (only one is visible in full on this image). The buildings will accommodate the converter units, busbars and control system that convert the AC current from the grid into DC current to be fed to the magnet system.

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