Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:

Please enter your email address:

@

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Cryostat base | Grand opening soon

    Picture a giant soup plate, 30 metres in diameter, slowing descending into a deep concrete cylinder. Track the near imperceptible movement of the double overhea [...]

    Read more

  • Research | ITER Scientist Fellows are at the cutting edge

    In the area of cutting-edge research—and particularly the sophisticated modelling of plasmas—the project is benefitting from the assistance of world-renowned ex [...]

    Read more

  • Image of the week | Testing the load path

    Teams are preparing now for the commissioning and dynamic load tests that will be carried out in the coming weeks on the assembly bridge cranes. The load tests, [...]

    Read more

  • In memoriam | Physicist John Wesson

    The theoretical physicist, author of a major reference book on magnetic confinement fusion in tokamaks, was known to many members of the ITER community. Some [...]

    Read more

  • CODAC | The "invisible system" that makes all things possible

    It is easy to spot all the big equipment going into ITER; what is not so visible is the underlying software that makes the equipment come alive. Local control [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived entries

Cryostat

Next phase for lower cylinder

At approximately 250 tonnes, the second tier of the ITER cryostat's lower cylinder represents only 15 percent of the cryostat's total weight. Still, in order to weld together its many segments, no less than 1.3 tonnes of filling metal will be required—another amazing figure that opens a window into the unique world of the super-massive ITER components ...

Working in pairs, one man on either side of the massive steel plates, welders will use approximately 1.3 tonnes of filling metal to finalize the welding of the second tier of the cryostat's lower cylinder. (Click to view larger version...)
Working in pairs, one man on either side of the massive steel plates, welders will use approximately 1.3 tonnes of filling metal to finalize the welding of the second tier of the cryostat's lower cylinder.
Following a traditional coconut ceremony, welding operations began on 21 February in the onsite Cryostat Workshop for the second level (tier two) of the lower cylinder.

Operating in tandem, one on either side of the cylinder's steel plates, welders will progressively fill the 5.2-metre-high, 50-millimetre-wide, trough-shaped seams between the segments using a technique called "butt welding." The total length of the welds for this part of the lower cylinder will add up to 160 metres.

Controlling distortions is always an issue when welding large high-tech components. "In the ITER cryostat, because of the number of openings, ports and penetrations and also because of the sheer mass of welds involved, welding is a considerable challenge", explains Vikas Dube, the responsible officer for manufacturing activities in the workshop.

Welding operations on the second tier of the lower cylinder should be complete by late March and the whole assembly (tiers one and two) is expected to be ready for factory acceptance testing in June.

 


return to the latest published articles