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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Gravity supports | More than just pedestals

    In the ITER Tokamak, components with the simplest of missions—like supporting a very heavy load—are pieces of highly sophisticated technology. Take the gravity [...]

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  • Plasma-facing units | China delivers last batch to WEST

    It will be very hot, next summer, on WEST plasma-facing components. Equipped with a full ITER-grade tungsten divertor, the CEA-operated tokamak will enter Phase [...]

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  • Image of the week | The welding of the feeder stubs

    Operating inside a plastic tent, this welder from MAN Energy Solutions is finalizing the connection between a feeder stub and the cryostat base. Feeder stubs ar [...]

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  • Fusion world | Technical University of Denmark wins fusion outreach grant

    A consequential grant from the Danish Novo Nordisk Foundation will permit two fusioneers from the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) to broaden their educati [...]

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  • IAEA Scientific Forum | Urgent need for a clean energy transition

    On 22-23 September the International Atomic Energy Agency held its annual Scientific Forum on the margins of its General Conference. This year's theme was 'N [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

Image of the week

200 million years ago at ITER

Back in the Mesozoic, some 66 to 250 million years ago, the ITER site lay at the bottom of a shallow sea that covered most of what is now Provence.

A foreman with a sharp eye: Christopher Lebreton spotted the circular shape imprinted on a rock excavated from the platform. (Click to view larger version...)
A foreman with a sharp eye: Christopher Lebreton spotted the circular shape imprinted on a rock excavated from the platform.
The warm waters swarmed with life: marine reptiles such as ichthyosaurs and plesiosaurs, sea urchins, belemnites and the ubiquitous ammonite, resembling present-day nautiluses.

A few weeks ago, as workers excavated a gallery for the Tokamak's cooling water system, a dweller of this ancient world resurfaced.

It wasn't noticed immediately, however. "We only saw the circular shape imprinted on the rock slab once it had been delivered to the deposit area behind the construction platform," explains Christopher Lebreton, a foreman with the contractor that is performing the excavation works—SVA (Spie-Batignolles, Valérian, ADF).

The shape imprinted on the rock was that of the coiled shell of an average-size ammonite—a species which could vary in size from 20 millimetres to 2.55 metres in diameter.

According to Caroline Gamache, a geologist with Spie-Batignolles, the limestone strata where the fossil was found can be dated back 120-200 million years—a time when dinosaurs ruled the Earth and our closest parent was a tiny mouse striving to survive in the realm of the "monstrous lizards."


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