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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Fusion Doctors | ITER hosts the future

    For three days last week, the ITER building was brimming with energy, inspiration and enthusiasm. One hundred and thirty-five young fusion aficionados took over [...]

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  • Fusion world | What's next for the stellarator?

    Earlier this year, the Wendelstein 7-X stellarator fusion project reported record achievements from its most recent experimental campaign. Newsline spoke with t [...]

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  • Metrology and the ITER machine | Perfectly planned points

    Inside of the Tokamak Complex, a network of 2,000 small 'fiducial target nests' will provide the reference datum for the dimensional control and alignment of ma [...]

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  • Breaking news | First component installed next week

    In the third week of November, the ITER Organization will be installing the first component of the machine in the basement of the Tokamak Building. The 10-met [...]

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  • Divertor inner target | Trial by fire

    Rigorous thermal tests are about to start on a full-scale industrial prototype of the divertor inner vertical target—a highly technical, tungsten-coated compone [...]

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Of Interest

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Science Festival

My village in 2030

Ruxandra Pilsiu

Can you imagine a village in 2030? The local "Fête de la Science" was the perfect place to do so this past weekend. Berre l'Etang, a village about 50 km from ITER, practiced the exercise by proposing to travel in time and discover what new technologies will be part of our lives in the future. ITER was there to represent fusion!
 
What happens to marshmallows when a vacuum is created under the dome? These children got a chance to find out. (Click to view larger version...)
What happens to marshmallows when a vacuum is created under the dome? These children got a chance to find out.
"The Village of the Future" hosted 150 organizations and 90 displays with hands-on experiments were proposed to students and the general public. The small ITER laboratory was a popular stop—visitors had the chance to see how a magnetic field is generated, to discover the principles of vacuum, and even to produce plasma into a microwave. 



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