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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Worksite postcards | Under fog and autumn light

    Due to its proximity to the Durance River and to the narrow gully spanned by the Bridge of Mirabeau, the area around ITER often experiences a peculiar meteorolo [...]

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  • Assembly Hall | Another massive paint job

    By the end of December, the massive painting job in the Assembly Hall will be complete and the building's floor will be as white and pristine as the landscape i [...]

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  • ITER India | Testing a neutral beam for diagnostics

    Every 23 seconds during fusion operation, a probe beam will penetrate deep into the core of the ITER plasma to aid in the detection of helium ash—one of fusion' [...]

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  • Welded attachments | Follow the laser projections

    How do you position 150,000 welded attachments on to a vacuum vessel the size of a house, each one needing to be accurately placed to less than a 4 mm target? [...]

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  • Visit | Our neighbour the Nobel

    In 2018, the Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to Gérard Mourou for his work on ultra-short, extremely high-intensity laser pulses—the so-called 'chirped pulse [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

Image of the week

Cryostat segments are made of this

Doric or ionic? Neither. What looks like broken columns from a Greek temple are in fact steel ingots, cooling on a bed of black sand inside the Larsen & Toubro foundry in Hazira, India.
 
Steel ingots for the ITER cryostat, cooling on a bed of black sand at Larsen & Toubro's foundry in Hazira, India. (Click to view larger version...)
Steel ingots for the ITER cryostat, cooling on a bed of black sand at Larsen & Toubro's foundry in Hazira, India.
These ingots, who weigh from 6 to 200 metric tonnes, are the raw material for the cryostat segments that the company manufactures for ITER.

Once cooled, the ingots are re-heated and forged by a massive, open-die hydraulic press, the largest in the sub-continent, capable of exerting a force of 9,000 metric tonnes.

It is only after being machined that the steel will acquire its familiar, mirror-like aspect.


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