Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:


Please enter your email address:

@

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Worksite postcards | Under fog and autumn light

    Due to its proximity to the Durance River and to the narrow gully spanned by the Bridge of Mirabeau, the area around ITER often experiences a peculiar meteorolo [...]

    Read more

  • Assembly Hall | Another massive paint job

    By the end of December, the massive painting job in the Assembly Hall will be complete and the building's floor will be as white and pristine as the landscape i [...]

    Read more

  • ITER India | Testing a neutral beam for diagnostics

    Every 23 seconds during fusion operation, a probe beam will penetrate deep into the core of the ITER plasma to aid in the detection of helium ash—one of fusion' [...]

    Read more

  • Welded attachments | Follow the laser projections

    How do you position 150,000 welded attachments on to a vacuum vessel the size of a house, each one needing to be accurately placed to less than a 4 mm target? [...]

    Read more

  • Visit | Our neighbour the Nobel

    In 2018, the Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to Gérard Mourou for his work on ultra-short, extremely high-intensity laser pulses—the so-called 'chirped pulse [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived entries

A new chapter

First machine component enters the Tokamak Pit

A new chapter opened last night in the history of ITER construction as the first machine component entered the Tokamak Pit through the narrow opening in the bioshield lid.

A highly symbolic moment inside the Tokamak Pit on the night of 26 November, as the first machine component was delicately lowered 30 metres down onto the floor, marking the beginning of five years of intense assembly activities. (Click to view larger version...)
A highly symbolic moment inside the Tokamak Pit on the night of 26 November, as the first machine component was delicately lowered 30 metres down onto the floor, marking the beginning of five years of intense assembly activities.
The Sun had just set on the ITER worksite when the cryostat feedthrough for poloidal field coil #4—a big, shiny stainless-steel pipe bent at a 90° angle—was slowly lifted from the Hot Cell zone to be deposited on the third level of the Tokamak Building.

There, passing from one crane to another, the 10-metre, 6.6-tonne component was delicately inserted through the rectangular opening of the lid, barely large enough to allow passage, and lowered onto the floor inside the perimeter of the Tokamak crown.

Since the cryostat feedthrough left the MIFI laboratory at the neighbouring CEA centre a week ago, six different lifting operations have been organized, involving four different contractors.

The 10-metre, 6.6-tonne component was delicately inserted through the rectangular opening of the lid, barely large enough to allow passage. (Click to view larger version...)
The 10-metre, 6.6-tonne component was delicately inserted through the rectangular opening of the lid, barely large enough to allow passage.
For Patrick Petit, ITER In-Cryostat Assembly Section leader, the faultless operation carried out on 26 November "demonstrated that we are ready to commence the assembly of the ITER Tokamak. We still have a lot of preparation work ahead of us but tonight marks the symbolic beginning of five years of intense assembly activities."

As  work is being finalized in the crown opening that will accommodate it, the cryostat feedthrough will now be "cocooned" in protective material before being moved, next week, into its final position. Newsline is planning a full report.


return to the latest published articles