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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • FEC2020 | Seeking sponsors for 28th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference

    For only the third time since 1961, the International Atomic Energy Agency's Fusion Energy Conference will be taking place in France—hosted jointly by the Frenc [...]

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  • Nuclear safety | Under constant scrutiny

    Because one of the elements involved in the fusion reaction is the radioactive isotope tritium, and because the hydrogen fusion reaction itself generates a high [...]

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  • Power conversion | Alien structures and strange contraptions

    There are places in ITER that seem to belong to another world, places full of alien structures and strange contraptions. The feeling—a mixture of awe and puzzle [...]

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  • Tokamak Complex | A changing landscape

    For the past three years, the view from the top of the highest worksite crane has not changed much. Inside of the Tokamak Complex, 80 metres below, concrete gal [...]

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  • Ion cyclotron heating | How to pump 20 MW of power into 1 gram of plasma

    To power the ion cyclotron system, the ITER Organization and its partners are designing not only new antennas, which will be housed in the tokamak vessel, but a [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

On site

Through the eyes of a crane operator

Sitting in his cabin 80 metres above the ground, Alex Dumonteil enjoys a most spectacular view. To the north, on a clear day, he can see as far as the Alpine ridge covered in eternal snow; to the south he has a clear view of the Sainte Victoire—the "mountain" that inspired Cézanne, Renoir, Kandinsky and several other art luminaries from the past two centuries.

Alex Dumonteil is one of 18 crane operators working in shifts on the ITER construction site. Last week he opened his cabin (perched 80 metres above ground) to Newsline. (Click to view larger version...)
Alex Dumonteil is one of 18 crane operators working in shifts on the ITER construction site. Last week he opened his cabin (perched 80 metres above ground) to Newsline.
Although he is well aware of the landscape's artistic references, Alex doesn't dwell on them. He has a job to do, and it is one that requires his constant attention.

Alex is one of eighteen crane operators on the ITER worksite. One glance to the control screen, another toward the crane hook visible through the glass floor of his cabin, the right hand on a joystick ... he spends eight hours a day lifting construction material and equipment and positioning the loads with utmost precision wherever they are needed.

Last week, Alex opened his cabin to Newsline, providing a unique opportunity to see the ITER worksite through the eyes of a crane operator.




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