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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Image of the week | Tokamak-sur-mer

    At the height of the heat wave, in late June, surface temperature on the ITER worksite climbed to the 50 °C range. To continue work—and protect workers—a series [...]

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  • Space propulsion | Have fusion, will travel

    The idea of propelling rockets and spaceships using the power of the atom is nothing new: the Manhattan Project in the mid-1940s as well as countless endeavours [...]

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  • Cold fusion | End of story?

    Thirty years ago, two electrochemists at the University of Utah, Martin Fleischmann and Stanley Pons, created a sensation when they claimed they had achieved fu [...]

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  • Magnet feeders | Wave of deliveries ahead

    Several batches of magnet feeder components will arrive from China in September containing elements that need to be received, inspected and readied for installa [...]

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  • Tokamak cooling system procurement | Global team for better efficiency

    A unique work-sharing arrangement is expediting the design and fabrication of ITER's tokamak cooling water system and building the knowledge base that will be c [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

On site

Through the eyes of a crane operator

Sitting in his cabin 80 metres above the ground, Alex Dumonteil enjoys a most spectacular view. To the north, on a clear day, he can see as far as the Alpine ridge covered in eternal snow; to the south he has a clear view of the Sainte Victoire—the "mountain" that inspired Cézanne, Renoir, Kandinsky and several other art luminaries from the past two centuries.

Alex Dumonteil is one of 18 crane operators working in shifts on the ITER construction site. Last week he opened his cabin (perched 80 metres above ground) to Newsline. (Click to view larger version...)
Alex Dumonteil is one of 18 crane operators working in shifts on the ITER construction site. Last week he opened his cabin (perched 80 metres above ground) to Newsline.
Although he is well aware of the landscape's artistic references, Alex doesn't dwell on them. He has a job to do, and it is one that requires his constant attention.

Alex is one of eighteen crane operators on the ITER worksite. One glance to the control screen, another toward the crane hook visible through the glass floor of his cabin, the right hand on a joystick ... he spends eight hours a day lifting construction material and equipment and positioning the loads with utmost precision wherever they are needed.

Last week, Alex opened his cabin to Newsline, providing a unique opportunity to see the ITER worksite through the eyes of a crane operator.




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