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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Worksite | First pillars for the crane hall

    For the overhead cranes to deliver machine components into the Tokamak assembly pit, the rails that carry them need to be extended some 80 metres beyond the tem [...]

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  • Transport | 300 tonnes of equipment on its way to ITER

    A specially designed assembly tool and elements of the cryostat and vacuum vessel thermal shields are part of the shipments travelling now from Korea to ITER. W [...]

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  • Fusion world | A new tokamak in town

    After EAST in China and WEST in France, another of the cardinal points of the compass has been chosen to name a tokamak. Introducing NORTH—the NORdic Tokamak de [...]

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  • Opportunities | Bringing the ITER Business Forum to Washington

    Every second year, a two-day ITER Business Forum is held to invite existing and potential suppliers for the ITER Project—laboratories, universities, and compani [...]

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  • World Energy Congress | Fusion "at a time of transition"

    In the United Arab Emirates, Abu Dhabi is often referred to as a tourism hotspot that combines luxury and ancient traditions. In September, Abu Dhabi was in the [...]

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Of Interest

See archived entries

On site

Through the eyes of a crane operator

Sitting in his cabin 80 metres above the ground, Alex Dumonteil enjoys a most spectacular view. To the north, on a clear day, he can see as far as the Alpine ridge covered in eternal snow; to the south he has a clear view of the Sainte Victoire—the "mountain" that inspired Cézanne, Renoir, Kandinsky and several other art luminaries from the past two centuries.

Alex Dumonteil is one of 18 crane operators working in shifts on the ITER construction site. Last week he opened his cabin (perched 80 metres above ground) to Newsline. (Click to view larger version...)
Alex Dumonteil is one of 18 crane operators working in shifts on the ITER construction site. Last week he opened his cabin (perched 80 metres above ground) to Newsline.
Although he is well aware of the landscape's artistic references, Alex doesn't dwell on them. He has a job to do, and it is one that requires his constant attention.

Alex is one of eighteen crane operators on the ITER worksite. One glance to the control screen, another toward the crane hook visible through the glass floor of his cabin, the right hand on a joystick ... he spends eight hours a day lifting construction material and equipment and positioning the loads with utmost precision wherever they are needed.

Last week, Alex opened his cabin to Newsline, providing a unique opportunity to see the ITER worksite through the eyes of a crane operator.




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