Enable Recite

Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:

Please enter your email address:

@

Your email address will only be used for the purpose of sending you the ITER Organization publication(s) that you have requested. ITER Organization will not transfer your email address or other personal data to any other party or use it for commercial purposes.

If you change your mind, you can easily unsubscribe by clicking the unsubscribe option at the bottom of an email you've received from ITER Organization.

For more information, see our Privacy policy.

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Construction | Art around every corner

    Most of us have experienced it. Turning a corner in one of the Tokamak Building galleries and looking up at the graphic pattern of embedded plates in the concre [...]

    Read more

  • Machine | Ensuring port plugs will work as planned

    The stainless steel plugs sealing off each Tokamak port opening are not only massive, they are also complex—carrying and protecting some of the precious payload [...]

    Read more

  • Networks | Ensuring real-time distributed computing at ITER

    Many of the control systems at ITER require quick response and a high degree of determinism. If commands go out late, the state of the machine may have changed [...]

    Read more

  • Fusion codes and standards | Award for ITER Japan's Hideo Nakajima

    Hideo Nakajima, a senior engineer at ITER Japan, has received an award from the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers (JSME) for his contribution to the develop [...]

    Read more

  • Machine assembly | First magnet in place

    When it travelled the ITER Itinerary last year, or during cold tests in the onsite winding facility, poloidal field coil #6 (PF6) felt rather large and massive. [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived entries

Machine assembly

ITER Organization awards two major contracts

Two international consortia have been selected to carry out the thousands of complex lifting, positioning, joining, and inspection activities behind the assembly, over the next five years, of the ITER core machine.

The TAC1 contract was signed in Beijing, China, on 30 September. Representatives of the CNPE consortium (formed by China Nuclear Power Engineering; China Nuclear Industry 23 Construction Company Ltd.; Southwestern Institute of Physics; Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences ASIPP; and Framatome) are pictured next to ITER Director-General Bernard Bigot. (Click to view larger version...)
The TAC1 contract was signed in Beijing, China, on 30 September. Representatives of the CNPE consortium (formed by China Nuclear Power Engineering; China Nuclear Industry 23 Construction Company Ltd.; Southwestern Institute of Physics; Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences ASIPP; and Framatome) are pictured next to ITER Director-General Bernard Bigot.
Following competitive global tender campaigns managed by ITER's Procurement & Contracts Division, two contracts for Tokamak machine assembly—TAC1 and TAC2—have been awarded and signed.

Each contract covers well-defined and distinct machine assembly scope, purposefully minimizing the interfaces between providers. (Two contracts, instead of one, were decided by the ITER Organization in the interest of preserving peer competition and protecting the project from contractor default.) Common to both contracts is the broad range of experience and skills that is demanded in order to handle, install, and align large, heavy, sensitive, and high-value components (such as superconducting magnet structures) to within accuracies of millimetres; to carry out the precise fit-up for weldments and mechanical connections; and to ensure 100 percent leak-tightness for all vacuum components and connections.

  • The TAC1 assembly contract—covering the cryostat and cryostat thermal shield; magnet feeders; the central solenoid, poloidal field and correction coil magnets; and cooling structures and instrumentation—has been awarded to the CNPE Consortium (China Nuclear Power Engineering; China Nuclear Industry 23 Construction Company Ltd.; Southwestern Institute of Physics; Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences ASIPP; and Framatome).
  • The TAC2 assembly contract—covering the main vessel and ports, sector sub-assembly with toroidal field coils and vacuum vessel thermal shielding, and welding—has been awarded to the DYNAMIC SNC consortium (Ansaldo Nucleare; Endel Engie; Orys Group ORTEC; SIMIC; Ansaldo Energia; and Leading Metal Mechanic Solutions SL).
The ITER Director-General, Bernard Bigot, signed the TAC1 contract today, Monday 30 September, in Beijing, China (see photo). TAC2 was signed on 29 July at ITER Headquarters by the Director-General and Francesco Maestri (CEO of Ansaldo Nucleare) from the DYNAMIC SNC consortium.

"These are major contracts for the ITER Organization," according to Bernard Bigot. "We have carefully prepared more than 1,200 engineering work packages for the mechanical installation of the ITER machine components and planned the assembly sequences; we are pleased we have found highly qualified and motivated partners for the execution of the work. We look forward to collaborating with world-renowned industry specialists for the on-time and to-specification assembly of one of the world's most challenging, promising and important scientific instruments." 

Each contract is broken into phases, with detailed works assigned progressively to the contractors through ITER Organization work packages. The execution of assembly works will take place under the day-to-day management of ITER's Construction Management-as-Agent, MOMENTUM.

An initial preparatory period, underway now, is dedicated to ensuring a common and thorough understanding of the technical and management requirements and constraints, the roles of different project actors, and the physical workspaces. The consortia are developing their on-site organization and teams, and creating detailed implementation processes and procedures.

"The competence and experience of the TAC contractors, and the ability, experience, and training of their engineering and construction teams will have a direct influence on the quality of work, the schedule, and ultimately the performance of the ITER machine," stresses Christophe Dorschner, head of the Procurement & Contracts Division. "The high quality of the interactions so far sends a strong positive signal about our expectations for performance over the coming years. Moreover, the international nature of the groups selected reflects the multinational collaboration that is at the core of the ITER Project."

Follow these links to read press releases from the CNPE (in Chinese) and DYNAMIC (in English and Italian) consortia.



return to the latest published articles