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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Divertor | Far more than a fancy ashtray

    It has been likened to the filter of a swimming pool or an oversized ashtray. It has been called alien in shape and hellish in its affinity for heat. But whatev [...]

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  • Council milestone #50 | The way to assembly is open

    Passing an ITER Council milestone is always an achievement. Passing this milestone at this moment is much more than that: it is a demonstration that, despite th [...]

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  • Deliveries | A third magnet ready for transport to ITER

    Three ITER magnets are now in transit to ITER from different points on the globe—two toroidal field magnets and one poloidal field coil. In terms of component w [...]

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  • Heaviest load yet | Europe's coil soon to hit the road

    It's big, it's heavy, it's precious and it's highly symbolic: the toroidal field coil that was unloaded at Marseille industrial harbour on 17 March is the most [...]

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  • Russia's ring coil | Entering the final sequence

    The smallest of ITER's poloidal field coils is entering the final sequence in a long series of activities that transform cable-in-conduit superconductor into a [...]

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Of Interest

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Worksite postcards

Under fog and autumn light

Due to its proximity to the Durance River and to the narrow gully spanned by the Bridge of Mirabeau, the area around ITER often experiences a peculiar meteorological phenomenon: whereas the rest of the countryside basks in bright sunlight, a thick fog settles on the approaches of the ITER worksite.

As the fog over the Durance River valley dissipates, the ITER site is revealed in all its industrial beauty. Photo: ITER Organization/EJF Riche (Click to view larger version...)
As the fog over the Durance River valley dissipates, the ITER site is revealed in all its industrial beauty. Photo: ITER Organization/EJF Riche
On the morning of 25 October, our drone operator captured the precise moment when the installation buildings emerge from the clearing fog—a spectacular and unusual image that conveys an eerie feeling ...

In this latest drone survey, many other things were captured: the monster crawler crane stationed at the side of the Tokamak Complex, ready to extend its 120-metre long boom to install the pillars of the future crane hall; the crisp details of the installation's buildings, outlined by the autumn light; and the ongoing works in and around the Tokamak Complex.

Once again, the ITER site is revealed in all its industrial beauty—a unique place for a unique purpose.


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