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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Fusion events | Bringing power to the people

    In tandem with the annual Fête de la Science, a French exhibition on the sciences, the European research consortium EUROfusion is premiering a new travelling ex [...]

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  • Fusion world | Stellarators "an option" for future power plants

    In the history of magnetic fusion, the photo is iconic. A smiling, bespectacled middle-aged man stands next to a strange contraption sitting on a makeshift wood [...]

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  • Divertor cassettes | Europe awards final contract

    Fifty-four divertor cassettes form the backbone of a unique system designed to exhaust waste gas from the ITER machine and minimize impurities in the plasma. In [...]

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  • Image of the week | 2nd central solenoid module on its way

    A second module for the ITER central solenoid, the "most powerful magnet in the world," is on its way to ITER. Procured by US ITER and manufactured b [...]

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  • Disruption mitigation | Perfecting the pellet

    ITER's success will depend in part on subduing potential plasma instabilities. A team at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the United States is tackling the chal [...]

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Of Interest

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Education

Make your own tokamak with 3D printing!

It's not Lego, but it is definitely "hands-on." To offer a tangible device to illustrate the workings of magnetic confinement fusion in a tokamak, the ITER Organization has worked with the Hungarian Centre for Energy Research to create a 3D-printable model for students, teachers, and "makers" around the world. The model made its first public appearance during ITER's start-of-assembly celebration on Tuesday 28 July.
 
How do giant magnets and other components fit together to make a tokamak? Thanks to Tamás Szabolics and Márton Vavrik from the Centre for Energy Research in Hungary, a simplified 3D printed model (30 cm x 30 cm) of the ITER Tokamak—1/100th of the real size—is now available for demonstrations and educational purposes ... or just because you love tokamaks! (Click to view larger version...)
How do giant magnets and other components fit together to make a tokamak? Thanks to Tamás Szabolics and Márton Vavrik from the Centre for Energy Research in Hungary, a simplified 3D printed model (30 cm x 30 cm) of the ITER Tokamak—1/100th of the real size—is now available for demonstrations and educational purposes ... or just because you love tokamaks!
Newsline readers have been following with keen interest as ITER's supersized components have been navigating the seas and reinforced roadways en route to the ITER site. Fusion enthusiasts, the tech-geek maker community, and educators routinely send requests for ideas and materials to assist in explaining the complexities of the ITER machine to students and public audiences.
 
Responding to these requests, the ITER Communication team worked with Tamás Szabolics and Márton Vavrik from the Centre for Energy Research (Hungarian Academy of Sciences), who used ITER's computer CAD drawings to create a simplified model suitable for 3D printing. The model will allow users to print out each major component, to explain the functions of the various magnet systems, and to follow along with ITER's assembly over the coming years.
 
See these resources for complete instructions:
 
* A complete user guide for the 3D printing of the ITER Tokamak model is available here. It includes detailed instructions, links to recommended software, and contact information for additional help.
 
* The recommended selection of plastic filaments can be found here.
* The 3D print files can be found here and here. Additional component files will be added over time.
* For a photographic record of what your printed components should look like, see this gallery.
* A video showing the use of the model can be seen here.


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