Enable Recite

Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:

Please enter your email address:

@

Your email address will only be used for the purpose of sending you the ITER Organization publication(s) that you have requested. ITER Organization will not transfer your email address or other personal data to any other party or use it for commercial purposes.

If you change your mind, you can easily unsubscribe by clicking the unsubscribe option at the bottom of an email you've received from ITER Organization.

For more information, see our Privacy policy.

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Art and ITER | Two sisters, two suns and a monument to fusion

    Amid the gentle slopes of Asciano, Italy, there stands a stone window that frames the Sun on the summer solstice. It looks as though it might have always been t [...]

    Read more

  • Staff | The men and women of ITER

    They hail from Ahmedabad and Prague ... from Naka and Moscow ... from Seoul, Hefei, Atlanta and hundreds of other towns and cities across the 35 nations partici [...]

    Read more

  • ITER Talks | All about ITER and fusion

    Beginning this autumn, the ITER Organization will be launching a new video series to inform, inspire and educate. The first video—introducing the series and off [...]

    Read more

  • Image of the week | A majestic components enters the stage

    The floor of the Assembly Hall is an ever-changing stage. Like characters in a grand production, components of all size and shapes make a spectacular entry, pl [...]

    Read more

  • Magnet system | A set of spares for the long journey

    In about five years, ITER will embark on a long journey through largely uncharted territory. Conditions will be harsh and—despite all the calculations, modellin [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived entries

Design of ITER's in-vessel coils converging

Two vertical stability coils (orange) provide fast vertical stabilization of the plasma. An array of 27 ELM coils (green and blue) provide a magnetic ''massage'' of the plasma exterior to suppress potentially harmful power deposition on plasma-facing components. (Click to view larger version...)
Two vertical stability coils (orange) provide fast vertical stabilization of the plasma. An array of 27 ELM coils (green and blue) provide a magnetic ''massage'' of the plasma exterior to suppress potentially harmful power deposition on plasma-facing components.
Last week, experts from around the world assembled virtually in Cadarache to conduct a preliminary design review of the ITER in-vessel coils and feeders. Their mission was to evaluate the results from the preliminary design work presented by the in-vessel coil design team. The hard work of the design team lead by the Princeton Plasma Physics Lab (PPPL) paid off with a successful review enabling design and R&D activities to proceed towards an interim review planned for March 2011.

The ITER in-vessel coil system is comprised of two systems: the vertical stability coils and the edge localized mode (ELM) coils. The vertical stability coils are two poloidal field coils located above and below the tokamak's mid-plane. They provide fast vertical stabilization of the plasma. The ELM coils, an array of 27 coils fixed to the wall of the vacuum vessel, provide resonant magnetic perturbations in order to control the plasma so that certain types of plasma instabilities called edge-localized modes are avoided. 

Each in-vessel coil is wound from about 50 metres of conductor consisting of a 59-mm outer diameter stainless steel jacket, an insulating layer of magnesium oxide and an inner copper conductor. Magnesium oxide is chosen for its ability to withstand the harsh radiation environment within the Tokamak. In total, the in-vessel coils require more than 4 km of mineral-insulated conductors. (Click to view larger version...)
Each in-vessel coil is wound from about 50 metres of conductor consisting of a 59-mm outer diameter stainless steel jacket, an insulating layer of magnesium oxide and an inner copper conductor. Magnesium oxide is chosen for its ability to withstand the harsh radiation environment within the Tokamak. In total, the in-vessel coils require more than 4 km of mineral-insulated conductors.
The control functions provided by these two coil systems are part of the overall plasma control system that ensures and maintains stable plasma operations. Two vertical stability coils (marked orange) provide fast vertical stabilization of the plasma. An array of 27 ELM coils (green & blue) provide a magnetic "massage" of the plasma exterior to suppress potentially harmful power deposition on plasma-facing components.

The masterminds behind the in-vessel coils at the Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (Click to view larger version...)
The masterminds behind the in-vessel coils at the Princeton Plasma Physics Lab.
Each in-vessel coil is wound from about 50 metres of conductor consisting of a 59-mm outer diameter stainless steel jacket, an insulating layer of magnesium oxide and an inner copper conductor. Magnesium oxide is chosen for its ability to withstand the harsh radiation environment within the ITER Tokamak. Water will flow through the central hole to remove power deposited from resistive and neutron heating. In total, the in-vessel coils require more than four kilometres of mineral-insulated conductors.

 
Click here to learn more about ELMs and how to control them
 
Clikc here to find out why not all ELMs are trees.


return to the latest published articles