Enable Recite

Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:

Please enter your email address:

@

Your email address will only be used for the purpose of sending you the ITER Organization publication(s) that you have requested. ITER Organization will not transfer your email address or other personal data to any other party or use it for commercial purposes.

If you change your mind, you can easily unsubscribe by clicking the unsubscribe option at the bottom of an email you've received from ITER Organization.

For more information, see our Privacy policy.

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • FEC 2020 | E-conference opens, participation never higher

    The 28th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference (FEC) is off to an auspicious start. Open to the public for the first time thanks to the technical possibilities of an al [...]

    Read more

  • Vacuum vessel in Europe | Fitting the pieces virtually

    A 'virtual fit' tool developed by the European Domestic Agency is helping the vacuum vessel manufacturing team anticipate the challenge of final assembly—the mo [...]

    Read more

  • Gas injection system | Last manifolds completed in China

    Contractors to the Chinese Domestic Agency have completed an important part of the gas injection system—the distribution manifolds that carry gas species from t [...]

    Read more

  • Magnets | Seventh vertical coil reaches ITER

    Seven toroidal field coils have reached ITER in the past year. The latest, TF3 from Europe, passed through the ITER gates on Friday 3 May. The European and Japa [...]

    Read more

  • Tritium Building | Work resumes

    The energy-producing plasmas in ITER will be fuelled in equal measure by the hydrogen isotopes deuterium and tritium. Deuterium is a stable element that industr [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived entries

Design of ITER's in-vessel coils converging

Two vertical stability coils (orange) provide fast vertical stabilization of the plasma. An array of 27 ELM coils (green and blue) provide a magnetic ''massage'' of the plasma exterior to suppress potentially harmful power deposition on plasma-facing components. (Click to view larger version...)
Two vertical stability coils (orange) provide fast vertical stabilization of the plasma. An array of 27 ELM coils (green and blue) provide a magnetic ''massage'' of the plasma exterior to suppress potentially harmful power deposition on plasma-facing components.
Last week, experts from around the world assembled virtually in Cadarache to conduct a preliminary design review of the ITER in-vessel coils and feeders. Their mission was to evaluate the results from the preliminary design work presented by the in-vessel coil design team. The hard work of the design team lead by the Princeton Plasma Physics Lab (PPPL) paid off with a successful review enabling design and R&D activities to proceed towards an interim review planned for March 2011.

The ITER in-vessel coil system is comprised of two systems: the vertical stability coils and the edge localized mode (ELM) coils. The vertical stability coils are two poloidal field coils located above and below the tokamak's mid-plane. They provide fast vertical stabilization of the plasma. The ELM coils, an array of 27 coils fixed to the wall of the vacuum vessel, provide resonant magnetic perturbations in order to control the plasma so that certain types of plasma instabilities called edge-localized modes are avoided. 

Each in-vessel coil is wound from about 50 metres of conductor consisting of a 59-mm outer diameter stainless steel jacket, an insulating layer of magnesium oxide and an inner copper conductor. Magnesium oxide is chosen for its ability to withstand the harsh radiation environment within the Tokamak. In total, the in-vessel coils require more than 4 km of mineral-insulated conductors. (Click to view larger version...)
Each in-vessel coil is wound from about 50 metres of conductor consisting of a 59-mm outer diameter stainless steel jacket, an insulating layer of magnesium oxide and an inner copper conductor. Magnesium oxide is chosen for its ability to withstand the harsh radiation environment within the Tokamak. In total, the in-vessel coils require more than 4 km of mineral-insulated conductors.
The control functions provided by these two coil systems are part of the overall plasma control system that ensures and maintains stable plasma operations. Two vertical stability coils (marked orange) provide fast vertical stabilization of the plasma. An array of 27 ELM coils (green & blue) provide a magnetic "massage" of the plasma exterior to suppress potentially harmful power deposition on plasma-facing components.

The masterminds behind the in-vessel coils at the Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (Click to view larger version...)
The masterminds behind the in-vessel coils at the Princeton Plasma Physics Lab.
Each in-vessel coil is wound from about 50 metres of conductor consisting of a 59-mm outer diameter stainless steel jacket, an insulating layer of magnesium oxide and an inner copper conductor. Magnesium oxide is chosen for its ability to withstand the harsh radiation environment within the ITER Tokamak. Water will flow through the central hole to remove power deposited from resistive and neutron heating. In total, the in-vessel coils require more than four kilometres of mineral-insulated conductors.

 
Click here to learn more about ELMs and how to control them
 
Clikc here to find out why not all ELMs are trees.


return to the latest published articles