Subscribe options

Select your newsletters:

Please enter your email address:

@

News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Cryostat base insertion | "A moment that will live in our memories"

    In the closing scene of the 1977 movie Close Encounters of the Third Kind, an alien spaceship hovers above an anxious and awestruck crowd of scientists and engi [...]

    Read more

  • Cryolines | Another day, another spool

    Having wedged his body and equipment into the cramped space between the ceiling and the massive pipe, a worker is busy welding two cryolines spools. A few metre [...]

    Read more

  • Image of the week | Bearings unveiled

    The construction teams are in the last stages of preparing the Tokamak pit for the first major operation of ITER machine assembly: the lowering of the cryostat [...]

    Read more

  • Technology | Perfecting tritium breeding for DEMO and beyond

    While ITER will never breed tritium for its own consumption, it will test breeding blanket concepts—the tools and techniques that designers of future DEMO react [...]

    Read more

  • Fusion world | Japan and Europe complete the assembly of JT-60SA

    The JT-60SA fusion experiment in Naka, Japan, is designed to explore advanced plasma physics in support of the operation of ITER and next-phase devices. After s [...]

    Read more

Of Interest

See archived entries

A large rock to act as First Stone

''I tried to create something that conveys the significance of the project and is a bit unsettling at the same time,'' says sculptor Bernard Brandi (right, next to Joseph Pilati and Jean-Philippe Cros). (Click to view larger version...)
''I tried to create something that conveys the significance of the project and is a bit unsettling at the same time,'' says sculptor Bernard Brandi (right, next to Joseph Pilati and Jean-Philippe Cros).
On Wednesday, 17 November, the ITER Headquarters' First Stone will be laid by Academician Velikhov and Prof. Motojima, in the presence of all the Heads of Delegation to the ITER Council.

On the platform overlooking the future Headquarters worksite, the stone—quite a large chunk of rock actually—is being prepared by Marseille sculptor Bernard Brandi and stone carvers from Entreprise Pilati, also from Marseille.

The 2.5-tonne rock, which comes from the depths of the Tokamak Pit, will be placed in the entrance hall, or in the nearby gardens of the future building, bearing witness to that day in mid-November 2010 when the first of the ITER buildings symbolically came into existence.

Bernard Brandi, who specializes in creating public monuments, has created a strange and futuristic work of art that carries the symbols of what ITER is about. Of course we will say no more, so that the unveiling of the First Stone, on Wednesday, comes as a surprise to everyone.

"I tried to do something dynamic," says the artist. "I used different materials in order to create something that conveys the significance of the project and is a bit unsettling at the same time."

We will know on Wednesday if the artist has succeeded in capturing in stone the "spirit of ITER."


return to the latest published articles