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News & Media

Latest ITER Newsline

  • Gravity supports | First production unit in China

    Bolted in a perfect circle to the pedestal ring of the cryostat base, 18 gravity supports will brace the curved outer edge of each toroidal field coil. These un [...]

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  • Conference | Fun-filled vacuum

    The science of ITER is not simple. But with a bit of imagination (and a dose of humour) a way can be found to convey the most complex physics notions to a publi [...]

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  • Naive question of the week | What happens to the car keys?

    We begin today a new series that aims to answer basic, even naive, questions about fusion and ITER. An image used often, when trying to convey the amount of e [...]

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  • Metrology | Facing the millimetre test

    In the realm of the very large at ITER, some of the biggest challenges are lurking down in the millimetre range. Within the Assembly Building a massive struct [...]

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  • Fusion research in Europe | Working it out together

    In Europe, fusion research is structured around a goal-oriented roadmap that closely involves universities, research laboratories and industry. Sibylle Günter, [...]

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Of Interest

See archived articles

See the progress of the ITER site!

Aris Apollonatos, Fusion for Energy

 (Click to view larger version...)
With more than 160 engineers and 140 workers on site, and after more than seven months of blasting and drilling, construction on the ITER site has taken off! The biggest international scientific collaboration in the field of energy is going up.

Given the increasing volume of requests for photos and clips, Fusion for Energy (F4E), the European Domestic Agency for ITER, has decided to bring the worksite to you by documenting the pace of change on a monthly basis. How? Our contractor, ADB, is visiting the site twice per month in order to take pictures and obtain footage on the progress of the works.

We therefore invite you to discover step by step how the ITER landscape is changing. We have kicked off with a series of clips bringing you footage from the construction of the Poloidal Field Coils Winding building, the Tokamak Pit and the future ITER Headquarters.

A new section in our image gallery called ITER 2011 has been launched where you can get a glimpse of the best pictures of this year so far. To see the progress of the site since the works started you can visit our 2010 archive. For those eager to see the blasts happening in action, we have uploaded new clips in our multimedia section.


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